24 May 2016
AsiaNews.it Twitter AsiaNews.it Facebook
Geographic areas




  • > Africa
  • > Central Asia
  • > Europe
  • > Middle East
  • > Nord America
  • > North Asia
  • > South Asia
  • > South East Asia
  • > South West Asia
  • > Sud America
  • > East Asia

  • mediazioni e arbitrati, risoluzione alternativa delle controversie e servizi di mediazione e arbitrato


    » 02/16/2005, 00.00

    NORTH KOREA

    'Dear Leader' worship as the one religion



    Pyongyang (AsiaNews) – Religious worship is allowed in North Korea as long as it is the personality cult of Kim Jong-Il and his father, the late Kim Il-Sung.

    Followers of traditional religions have obstacles to surmount, especially Buddhists and Christians, such as joining Communist Party-controlled organisations.

    Those who do not join are persecuted, often brutally and violently. Anyone engaged in any kind of missionary activity is the recipient of a similar treatment.

    Since the end of the Korean War in 1953 about 300,000 Christians have disappeared; any priest or nun who alive then has disappeared, most likely persecuted to death.

    About 100,000 are surviving in labour camps with hunger and torture as their main companions and, for some, with death just around the corner. This is corroborated by former North Korean officials and ex prisoners who have said that Christians in the camps are singled out for especially harsh treatment.

    In North Korea the population is divided in 51 state-sanctioned social and occupational groups. Positions at the bottom of this hierarchy are reserved for unregistered practicing believers. For them, educational and job opportunities are few and far in between; so are food vouchers. However, they do receive plenty of cruel and hurtful care.

    One would not know this from what the North Korean government says. Adamant to prove that religious freedom exists in the country, North Korean authorities are quick to point out that religious freedom is guaranteed in the country's constitution.

    According to official figures, there are an estimated 10,000 Buddhists, 10,000 Protestants and 4,000 Catholics registered with officially sanctioned religious organisations.  In Pyongyang itself there are three churches: two Protestant and one Catholic.

    However, according to Aid To The Church In Need' 2004 Report on religious freedom, worship in such churches is less than traditional. 'Dear Leader' worship seems to be the main staple in the Protestant churches and in the capital's one Catholic church religious practice involves a once-a-week collective prayer but with no priest.

    These days emigration is very popular among the hungry and those seeking greater religious freedom. They are however taking their chances since the death penalty and forced labour camps await them if they are ever caught.

    And their chances have recently gotten worse when China and North Korea signed an agreement that requires Pyongyang's northern neighbour to repatriate North Korean 'illegal immigrants' found on its territory.

    e-mail this to a friend Printable version










    See also

    23/11/2004 NORTH KOREA
    Kim portraits removed, report confirms


    15/02/2005 NORTH KOREA
    Is Kim Jong-il preparing his succession or strengthening his hold on power?
    There are different views but all agree that something is happening in Pyongyang.

    18/04/2011 NORTH KOREA
    Pyongyang, regime "princes" put Kim dictatorship at risk
    Led by the two younger sons of Kim Jong-il, the "grandchildren" of the Revolution, trade in illegal drugs and use state funds to gamble in Macao or see a rock concert in Singapore. The "Dear Leader" can’t stand them but has to put up with them, as his heir is one of them.

    20/12/2004 NORTH KOREA
    Kim Jong-il's son escapes assassination attempt
    The situation inside North Korea's leadership is increasingly confused.

    28/10/2008 KOREAS – JAPAN
    Despite claims and counterclaims, nothing is certain about Kim Jong-il’s health
    Japan’s prime minister says that the North Korean leader is recovering in hospital and that he is still able to make decisions. South Korean intelligence says he is quickly recovering. The Communist regime proffers new threats against the South.



    Editor's choices

    CHINA - VATICAN
    The persecution of Catholics during the Cultural Revolution

    Sergio Ticozzi

    The documentation of that violent period was burned or buried in archives. Only a few survivors speak. The persecutors are silent in fear. The burning of religious objects and furnishings in Hebei. Bishops humiliated and arrested in Henan; nuns beaten with sticks and killed, or buried alive. A persecution that "is not over yet"; Today it is perhaps only more subtle.


    CHINA
    Silence shrouds 50th anniversary of Cultural Revolution in China and in the West

    Bernardo Cervellera

    The bloody campaign launched by Mao Zedong killed nearly 2 million people and sent  a further 4 million to concentration camps. Every Chinese has been marked by fear. But today, no memorial service has been planned and no newspaper article has appeared. The Party’s internal struggles and Xi Jinping’s fear of ending up like the USSR. Even today, as then, there are those in Europe who keep quiet and laud the myth of China. Many are predicting a return to the "great chaos".

     


    AsiaNews IS ALSO A MONTHLY!

    AsiaNews monthly magazine (in Italian) is free.
     

    SUBSCRIBE NOW

    News feed

    Canale RSScanale RSS 

    Add to Google









     

    IRAN 2016 Banner

    2003 © All rights reserved - AsiaNews C.F. e P.Iva: 00889190153 - GLACOM®