09 December 2016
AsiaNews.it Twitter AsiaNews.it Facebook
Geographic areas




  • > Africa
  • > Central Asia
  • > Europe
  • > Middle East
  • > Nord America
  • > North Asia
  • > South Asia
  •    - Afghanistan
  •    - Bangladesh
  •    - Bhutan
  •    - India
  •    - Nepal
  •    - Pakistan
  •    - Sri Lanka
  • > South East Asia
  • > South West Asia
  • > Sud America
  • > East Asia

  • mediazioni e arbitrati, risoluzione alternativa delle controversie e servizi di mediazione e arbitrato


    » 01/19/2009, 00.00

    PAKISTAN

    Swat Valley: Taliban blow up five schools, threaten school girls

    Qaiser Felix

    Carnage averted because of winter break. The government reiterates its commitment to re-opening schools in March, but the safety of tens of thousands of school girls remains in jeopardy. Another Pakistani fundamentalist group calls on Taliban to reconsider their decision and guarantee instead an education to girls as well.
    Peshawar (AsiaNews) – The Taliban blew up five schools this morning in the town of Mingora, Swat district, north-western Pakistan. No one was killed or hurt in the blasts because schools were closed for the winter break. However, this is of little comfort to the thousands of students and teachers frightened by being the targets of choice for fundamentalist militias, who last year destroyed more than 150 school buildings.

    Even though Pakistani authorities announced recently that they would guarantee the re-opening of schools in the Swat Valley, the Taliban remain a threat to tens of thousands of girls who want to continue their education at the end of the winter break.

    Last December the latter had threatened to blow up school buildings and kill any girl going to class after 15 January.

    About 400 private schools in the Swat Valley, an area located in the North-West Frontier Province (NWFP) on the border with Afghanistan, are being forced to stay closed. Re-opening, which was scheduled for early February, might have to wait till March.

    “From March 1, all closed schools in Swat and NWFP will be reopened after the winter break,” Information Minister Sherry Rehman said. “Non-state actors are challenging the writ of the government in the name of Sharia, but Islam does not allow the closure of women's schools,” she explained.

    Still the 400 Swat Valley  schools are not re-opening any time soon, leaving the education of about 80,000 female students from Grade 5 and up as well as the jobs of some 8,000 female teachers in jeopardy.

    Ziauddin Yusufzai, spokesman for an association of private school owners in Swat, also said that the resumption of classes was in doubt. Schools “were due to re-open in early February, but after the Taliban warning, it seems impossible now for us to resume classes.” Instead, winter holidays might be extended until March.

    For education ministry official Sher Afzal, “tens of thousands will be deprived of education.”

    Since security forces launched an operation against militants in the region in 2007, the Taliban have blown up 168 schools, including 104 for girls, an education ministry official.

    None the less, NWFP Minister for Primary Education Sardar Hussain Babak said in Peshawar that the NWFP government would provide full security and protection to educational institutions, especially to girls’ schools in the restive Swat district; nobody would be allowed to burn or destroy them in the name of religion.

    The North-West Frontier Province has been the scene of major attacks by the Taliban who want to impose the Sharia and Islamic courts on the area.

    Interestingly, another government banned fundamentalist group, the Tehrik-i-Taliban Pakistan (TTP), has said that it did not oppose education for both boys and girls.

    A TTP spokesman, Maulvi Omar, said that his organisation has contacted the Taliban in Swat Valley, to convince them to reconsider their decision to ban girls’ education.

    e-mail this to a friend Printable version










    See also

    10/10/2012 PAKISTAN
    Young Pakistan activist Malala Yousafzai, "out of danger"
    Doctors have removed the bullet lodged in her head and judge her condition stable. The girl, aged 14, was the victim of an Taliban fundamentalist attack she was shot outside her school. Since 2009, with the opening of a blog on the BBC, she has been a symbol of the fight against extremists and for girls' education.

    01/06/2009 PAKISTAN
    New Taliban attacks, two dead and eight wounded in NWFP
    Islamists attack a bus terminal in Kohat. In the Mohmand Agency area a school for girls is demolished. Military lifts daytime curfew in seven Swat Valley towns to let civilians out of their hiding places. The number of displaced people hits the three million mark as the humanitarian emergency continues.

    14/07/2009 PAKISTAN
    Despite threats from the Taliban, we are working for the good of the country, Pakistani Catholic say
    Religious minorities, including the Christian community, are victims of a campaign of intimidation. Fundamentalists want to force conversion and extort money. The executive secretary of the National Commission for Justice and Peace of the Catholic Church highlights its commitment to the population and to the topmost principle of the “separation of state and religion.”

    14/01/2011 AFGHANISTAN
    Taliban no longer opposed to female education
    Afghan education minister makes the announcement in London. Sources tell AsiaNews that a cultural change is underway in the country. However, low teacher salaries and the distribution of international aid in education are major problems.

    12/05/2009 PAKISTAN
    Army and Taliban battle it out in “the most dangerous nation in the world”
    Commandos assault Piochar where 4 thousand militants are entrenched. Ten dead, among them a six year old girl, in a suicide attack. Rocket attacks on girl’s schools and the sanctuary of a Pashtun poet. A Canadian Minister describes Pakistan and its nuclear arsenal “the most dangerous nation in the world”.



    Editor's choices

    IRAQ
    "Adopt a Christian from Mosul": A Christmas gift to survive winter

    Bernardo Cervellera

    As Iraqi troops advance in the Nineveh Plain and Mosul, a new wave of refugees could overshadow the fate of other refugees who found hospitality in Kurdistan. People need kerosene, winter clothes, aid for children, and money for rent. The campaign AsiaNews launched two years ago is more urgent than ever. Give up a superfluous gift to offer refugees an essential gift for life.


    IRAQ
    Pastor of Amadiya: Mosul’s Christian refugees, torn between emergency aid and the longing to return home

    P. Samir Youssef

    In a letter Fr. Samir Youssef describes the situation of refugees, exiled from their home for more than two years. They are closely following the offensive to retake Mosul, although their homes and churches "are for the most part" burned or destroyed. With the arrival of winter there is a serve lack of heating oil, clothes, food and money to pay for their children’s school bus. An appeal to continue to support the AsiaNews campaign.


    AsiaNews IS ALSO A MONTHLY!

    AsiaNews monthly magazine (in Italian) is free.
     

    SUBSCRIBE NOW

    News feed

    Canale RSScanale RSS 

    Add to Google









     

    IRAN 2016 Banner

    2003 © All rights reserved - AsiaNews C.F. e P.Iva: 00889190153 - GLACOM®