4 October, 2015 AsiaNews.it Twitter AsiaNews.it Facebook            

Help AsiaNews | About us | P.I.M.E. | | RssNewsletter | Mobile

mediazioni e arbitrati, risoluzione alternativa delle controversie e servizi di mediazione e arbitrato

e-mail this to a friend printable version

» 06/07/2007
Wu Bangguo: Hong Kong’s autonomy laid down by Beijing
The head of the Chinese Parliament denies the city’s autonomy from Beijing and that the judicial and executive powers can be independent from political powers. Hong Kong politicians and experts counter that Basic Law does not exclude their full autonomy.

Beijing (AsiaNews/Agencies) – However much power the central government decides to assign to Hong Kong, this is what the Hong Kong gets. Wu Bangguo, The head of the National People's Congress, China’s Parliament, has recalled the limits – according to Beijing – of the city’s autonomy.

Article 20 of the Basic Law, which provides a legal basis for dealing with subsequent assignment of power by Beijing and also comprises the possibility of free and democratic elections, has often been cited by Hong Kong as a justification for the assignment of increased autonomy. Wu told a forum to mark the 10th anniversary of the implementation of the Basic Law – in the presence of Hong Kong Executive Chief Donald Tsang Yam-kuen - that “there was no question of the city being entitled to "residual power"”. China – he continued – has one single government and the “high degree of autonomy” enjoyed by Hong Kong is not a specific attribute of the SAR [special administrative region] but comes directly from Beijing. Wu insisted the chief executive must play a "dominant role" in the establishment and operation of the SAR government. He said it would not be appropriate to copy the separation of powers between the executive, legislature and judiciary or the parliamentary system from abroad.

Experts maintain that Wu, without making any explicit references, wanted to warn the city not seek political solutions which undermine the “absolute power” of Beijing, also because this summer Hong Kong’s political reform is due to be voted on and Basic Law provides for the setting up of universal suffrage by 2008.  

Political scientist Ma Ngok of Chinese University in Hong Kong told the South China Morning Post that “The message is clear. All powers come from Beijing and it has the ultimate say on `yes' or `no' on everything”.

For over ten years, since the ex British colony was returned to Chinese rule, Hong Kong has sought greater independence and the adoption of democratic elections.  The judiciary has remained independent of political power.

Liberal Party chairman James Tien Pei-chun, responds that said while the principle of separation of powers was not spelled out in the Basic Law, he believed it was part of the "one country, two systems" and "high degree of autonomy" package. Ma agrees pointing out that generally states in a federal system, through a written constitution, would hand over specific powers to the federal government.

But Beijing is against this interpretation of the law.  Already in 2004 Qiao Xiaoyang, undersecretary to the general committee of the National People’s Assembly, said that China had a central government that holds all power and that the local authorities only had powers delegated to them from Beijing.


e-mail this to a friend printable version

See also
03/17/2007 HONG KONG
March for Democracy, a small sign of dissent
by Dominic Yung
10/17/2014 HONG KONG - CHINA
As police clear Mong Kok, expectations and doubts about the talks with the government persist
06/05/2007 HONG KONG - CHINA
Over 55 thousand hold vigil in memory of Tiananmen victims
06/18/2010 HONG KONG – CHINA
Donald Tsang (and China) loses TV debate on democracy
by James Wang
12/13/2007 HONG KONG - CHINA
Donald Tsang in Beijing: universal suffrage for 2012; no, rather 2017

Editor's choices
Pope in the US: “We Christians, the Lord’s disciples, ask the families of the world to help us”In the last Mass of the World Meeting of Families in Philadelphia, Francis Pope highlights the daily "little gestures" that define the family, which is “the right place for faith to become life, and life to become faith". Gratitude, respect, and collaboration with families in which the Spirit operates can be found in every “family, people, region, or religion”.
Pope in the US: Without the family, the Church would not existFrancis met bishops gathered in Philadelphia for the eighth World Meeting of Families. “We might well ask whether in our pastoral ministry we are ready to ‘waste’ time with families. Whether we are ready to be present to them, sharing their difficulties and joys.” Young generations should not be blamed if they grew up with distorted values. “As pastors,” we must extend “a sincere invitation to young people to be brave and to opt for marriage and the family.”
As the pope’s visit to Cuba raises hopes, a sclerotic regime exploits it
by Tony Pino V.*As soon as he landed in Cuba, Pope Francis issued a message of faith, peace, forgiveness, reconciliation, compassion, and mercy, urging people to be child-like. As the regime conducts picture-perfect parades, ordinary Cubans pray to Our Lady of El Cobre asking for help to leave the island to live elsewhere. The US embargo has been an excuse to stifle dissent and development. So far, Cuban leaders have not done any ‘mea culpa’.


Copyright © 2003 AsiaNews C.F. 00889190153 All rights reserved. Content on this site is made available for personal, non-commercial use only. You may not reproduce, republish, sell or otherwise distribute the content or any modified or altered versions of it without the express written permission of the editor. Photos on AsiaNews.it are largely taken from the internet and thus considered to be in the public domain. Anyone contrary to their publication need only contact the editorial office which will immediately proceed to remove the photos.