Russian Islamic leaders against the Kremlin
The chief mufti attacks the State guilty of hindering the unification of the Muslims of the Federation and condemn those religious leaders who are working as puppets to quell the community's presence in the country.

Moscow (AsiaNews) – The leaders of the Russian Muslim community have launched a strong attack against the authorities in the country. The head of the Council of muftis of Russia, Ravil Gainutdin, accuses the state of wanting to obstruct the unification of Muslims and attempting to "suppress Islam" in the Federation. He has also described as "puppets" and "squalid people," those mufti who work in government institutions.

The project of unification of the Russian followers of Muhammad dates back to 2009. Then, Gainutdin said in an interview with Radio Liberty, "the mufti Talgat Tadzhuddin had proposed to merge the three central organizations of the Muslims of Russia." "After studying the idea – continued the religious leader – I together with the leader of the Caucasus Muslims, Berdiyev, met him. We created a working group to structure this unification. But the government did not approve of our decision. They claimed Talgat Tadzhuddin’s idea was not in line with government policy”.

Gainutdin’s charges against the State are also motivated by the recent creation of the fourth muftiyat (Islamic Council), the "Russian Association of Islamic agreement" designed precisely to prevent any process of unification. "The new ' pocket muftis ', who oppose the growth of Islam are mere puppets" says Gainutdin. "These puppets, like those who work in government, for example, the Islamophobic Grishin (the director of the Presidential Administration in charge of relations with Islamic organizations, ed), will not hesitate to suppress Islam in Russia ... which is already taking place, "he added.

Commenting on the recent clashes between Nationalist hooligans and mostly Muslim immigrants from the Caucasus, Gainutdin emphasized the existence of tensions in the capital home to more than two million Muslims. He also pointed out the need to build new mosques in Moscow, where the faithful are forced to pray, for lack of space, "in the streets, on tram lines, and even in the courtyards of churches." "This humiliation, this discriminatory policy against civil rights continue, before the eyes of Muslims around the world." (N.A.)

RUSSIA_ISLAM_(F)_1223_-_MuftiYES.jpg