28 January, 2015 AsiaNews.it Twitter AsiaNews.it Facebook            

Help AsiaNews | About us | P.I.M.E. | | RssNewsletter | Mobile





mediazioni e arbitrati, risoluzione alternativa delle controversie e servizi di mediazione e arbitrato
e-mail this to a friend printable version


» 10/18/2011
MYANMAR - INDIA
Archbishop of Yangon: signals of "positive" change from government
Archbishop Bo speaks of a people "full of hope" after more than 50 years of military rule that has hit the Church and citizens. The prelate does not deny "restrictions" or "discrimination", but sees a future of hope for the faithful. He defines India as the reference "model" and repeats the words of John Paul II: Asia mission territory for the third millennium.

Mumbai (AsiaNews) - The Burmese government has launched new "positive signals" such as the recent release of political prisoners and, before that, of Aung San Suu Kyi, now committed "actively in dialogue" with various ministers and the president Thein Sein, says Mgr. Charles Bo, Archbishop of Yangon, the economic and trade capital of Myanmar. He says that “changes are in progress" the results of which will be visible in the near future, but right now the "effects" are real. "We are a people - said the current President of the Office for Human Development (OHD), of the Federation of Asian Bishops (FABC) - full of hope."

From October 12 to 15, the President of Myanmar Thein Sein, the head of a Parliament composed largely of civilians, after decades of military dictatorship, made an official visit to India, where he was received with full honors. The country's ruling class - the result of the November 7, 2010"sham" elections - is still directly or politically supported by the army, but cracks have emerged that lead to a cautious optimism: from the release of the Nobel Laureate, the recent amnesty that affected about 300 political prisoners, the decision to halt the construction of the dam along the Irrawaddy River in Kachin territory, the ability to form trade unions and hold strikes, the hypothesis of loosening or removing media censorship.

"For over half a century - says Msgr. Bo, in India for the meeting of the Asian bishops - the country has been led by a military regime that has confiscated our mission schools, expelled foreign priests and today we have only local priests". The Archbishop of Yangon Myanmar emphasizes that the Church is not the victim of "direct persecution", but there are "restrictions" and "discrimination" as a religious minority that counts "only 1, 3% of the population." However, he adds, "there are positive signs within the Church in Burma", including the thousands of baptisms last year throughout Myanmar.

Archbishop Bo recalls the words of John Paul II: Asia is the protagonist of the third millennium, in Asia, the Catholic Church should revive the missionary journey of evangelization. "Asia is the birthplace - said the archbishop – of the world's major religions: Judaism, Christianity, Islam and Hinduism. The Holy Spirit leads the Church in its Mission and the Church's social doctrine is the guideline. "

The prelate’s concluding reflections are on India. Myanmar, should look to the country in the near future to continue down the democratic path. "India is a nation that is admired throughout Asia - says Msgr. Bo - India is the largest democracy in the world, with freedom of expression, religion and press". The Archbishop of Yangon sees it as a "very important" point of reference because "in many South Asian countries these freedoms are controlled. India, on the contrary, is a source of inspiration for all. " (NC)


e-mail this to a friend printable version

See also
10/02/2004 MYANMAR
First synod in Yangoon archdiocese
10/10/2011 MYANMAR
Myanmar reforms held back by junta in-fighting
12/24/2012 MYANMAR
Archbishop of Yangon: A Christmas of reconciliation and freedom for Burmese Catholics
by Francis Khoo Thwe
09/19/2011 MYANMAR
Apostolic delegate to Myanmar visits Mandalay archdiocese
by Yaung Ni Oo
07/01/2013 MYANMAR
As activist fears more violence, monks and ordinary Burmese take to the streets to defend Buddhism
by Francis Khoo Thwe

Editor's choices
IRAQ
The children of Mosul and the future: the "five-star" refugee camp
by Bernardo CervelleraIn the garden of the parish of Mar Elia beside the tents there are containers that serve as classrooms for the children and as a library. Another serves as a room for sewing. A children's choir. Fr. Douglas: "Taking care of refugees does not just mean thinking about eating, drinking, medicines, injections, vaccinations ... The displaced persons need to do something and to cultivate hope."
IRAQ
Way of the Cross: the refugees from Mosul beyond the emergency
by Bernardo CervelleraThere are at least half a million people who have taken refuge in Kurdistan to flee from ISIS. In the Shlama Mall at Erbil: 350 people living in the skeleton of a building under construction, with draped sheets and blankets serving as walls. The ordination of a young man, also a refugee, shows that with the flight, there is something that has not been destroyed: the faith, the traditions, the priesthood.
IRAQ - VATICAN
As 'Adopt a Christian from Mosul' continues, Mosul bishop notes that Jesus is born amid refugee containers
by Amel NonaPersecuted by the Islamic state, refugees have lost everything: belongings, home, jobs, school, and their future. Yet, their faith and mission remain strong. For them, almost 900,000 euros have been raised and sent. Pope Francis sends a message of closeness. The campaign continues according to the Patriarch of Baghdad's proposal of fasting and moderation at Christmas and New Year, with the money saved offered to the Christians of Mosul.

Dossier

by Giulio Aleni / (a cura di) Gianni Criveller
pp. 176
Copyright © 2003 AsiaNews C.F. 00889190153 All rights reserved. Content on this site is made available for personal, non-commercial use only. You may not reproduce, republish, sell or otherwise distribute the content or any modified or altered versions of it without the express written permission of the editor. Photos on AsiaNews.it are largely taken from the internet and thus considered to be in the public domain. Anyone contrary to their publication need only contact the editorial office which will immediately proceed to remove the photos.