27 November, 2015 AsiaNews.it Twitter AsiaNews.it Facebook            

Help AsiaNews | About us | P.I.M.E. | | RssNewsletter | Mobile

mediazioni e arbitrati, risoluzione alternativa delle controversie e servizi di mediazione e arbitrato

e-mail this to a friend printable version

» 02/27/2013
Benedict XVI's legacy: religious freedom and mission, from Vietnam to the Philippines
The pope was a model and guide for a nation ruled by a Communist government. A priest from Hue notes that Vietnam and the Holy See engaged in talks under Pope Benedict XVI. From predominantly Catholic Philippines comes a call to proclaim the Gospel.

Vatican City (AsiaNews) - "The Church in Vietnam needs witnesses of life and faith." Benedict XVI has been a "model and guide" in a nation ruled by a "Communist government that still restricts religious freedom," said Fr Joseph, a Vietnamese priest waiting in St Peter's Square to see his "beloved pope" who steps down from the Pontifical Seat tomorrow. Fr Reinaldo, a Filipino missionary, is also in the crowd. For him, the mission is every Catholic's responsibility, especially in Asia's only predominantly Christian nation, now close to Card Antonio Tagle, the archbishop of Manila and a possible successor to Benedict XVI.

"The Church in Vietnam needs a very strong faith," said Fr Joseph, from Hue (central Vietnam), because "we are still under a Communist government that restricts religious freedom." For him, Benedict XVI "represents faith in God" and "helps us become a model and witness to the world".

"In our society, faith is not deeply rooted and developed," the priest noted. "For this reason, it is important to promote it and proclaim it."

The pope, he explained, has gone a long way towards re-establishing diplomatic relations between the Holy See and Vietnam, but a lot remains to be done. "We look forward to the future, full of hope, and put ourselves in God's hands."

In concluding, "The Church in Vietnam needs to bear witness to life and faith," he said. "We need to be more Catholic."

Fr Reinaldo Bullas Jr, a Monfort missionary from the Philippines, is another witness. He is "sad but also happy for the pope and his decision. His pain and health problems prevented him from going on. For this reason, he took the great step." Benedict XVI's "constant call for unity" invites us "to deepen our love for the Church."

In the Philippines, we must offer "a deeper faith," he added, "taking part in the work of evangelisation at home and abroad. The mission is a duty for every Christian." (DS)

e-mail this to a friend printable version

See also
06/22/2005 PHILIPPINES
PIME superior in Manila: "Cardinal Sin: a man full of joy and resolve"
Pope: help young Filipinos to seek God and not the glamour of consumerism
Pope: support for "courageous steps" in Manila to promote peace and sustainable development
Pope: governments must work for proper integration of immigrants
A "saddened" Pope prays for victims of typhoon Durian

Editor's choices
Paris Massacre highlights the failure of Muslim integration in Europe
by Catherine FieldThe attack in the heart of France highlights the crisis of Europe’s model of coexistence. Social unrest, poverty and marginalisation feed youth extremism and radicalisation. A New Zealander journalist, expert on expertise in religion and interfaith dialogue, talks about it after undertaking a journey through the French Muslim world.
For Nîmes imam, Islam should not be held hostage by extremists
by Hochine DrouicheFrench imams condemn the Paris terrorist attacks and disassociate themselves from violence committed in "the name of our religion." At the same time, they ask Muslim communities to dare leading a life of dialogue and friendship with Europeans, without fear or arrogance. For centuries, Muslims have ruled out reason from their religious life. The vice president of French imams bears witness.
AsiaNews marks 12 years: Persecution and hope
by Bernardo CervelleraDespite a worldwide increase of ignorance, indifference and superficiality, many signs of love and hope resist even in the most gloomy situations: the Iraqi mother who gives birth to her child in a refugee camp and smiles even though she has nothing; the Indonesian Muslim mother who blesses her son who became a Christian and a priest; the Chinese Christian families that welcome children thrown away because of the one-child law.


Copyright © 2003 AsiaNews C.F. 00889190153 All rights reserved. Content on this site is made available for personal, non-commercial use only. You may not reproduce, republish, sell or otherwise distribute the content or any modified or altered versions of it without the express written permission of the editor. Photos on AsiaNews.it are largely taken from the internet and thus considered to be in the public domain. Anyone contrary to their publication need only contact the editorial office which will immediately proceed to remove the photos.