06/05/2012, 00.00
INDIA
Send to a friend

Catholic nuns: Ayurveda and acupuncture, to heal body and soul

by Nirmala Carvalho
In Prathnalaya ("House of Prayer") in Bandra (Mumbai) the Pious Disciples of the Divine Master welcome people of all castes and religion. On the occasion of World Environment Day, they explain the benefits of herbs and natural therapies for humans.

Mumbai (AsiaNews) - The use of alternative medicine and natural therapies to "create an optimal healing environment" and "promote the general welfare of the human being": this World Environment Day, Sister M.Valerian, superior of the Pious Disciples of the Divine Master (PDDM), explains the mission of the congregation in Prathnalaya ("house of prayer") of Bandra, Mumbai to AsiaNews about. Far from the chaos of the city and overlooking the sea, in the house the nuns look after the body and the spirit of hundreds of people of every caste and creed, in particular exploiting the beneficial capabilities of Ayurveda (traditional Indian medicine) and acupuncture.

All the nuns who work in Prathnalaya have followed certified and internationally recognized courses for practicing holistic therapies. Ayurvedic medicine is the most common and consists of herbal treatments and medicines. "In this way - explains the PDDM superior - not only do we care for people who have various aches and pains, but we encourage them to adopt such practices  which are in full respect of nature. Our body has an immense potential, and these therapies activate the energies necessary for self-regeneration ".

At first, many patients are wary of the effectiveness of these methods. But once experienced the benefits, Sr. Valerian adds, "they come back to treat more serious problems."

Among the various alternative therapies provided by religious are naturopathy, which is the stimulation of a spontaneous return to equilibrium of the human body, through massage, reflexology, hydrotherapy, cromopuncture, flower therapy, climate therapy, aromatherapy, acupuncture and acupressure sujok, a South Korean variant of traditional Chinese acupuncture, which consists of the single stimulation of hands (su) and feet (jok) to treat the whole body, magnetic therapy, which utilizes the interaction of magnetic fields with the human body, Jin Shin Do, a technique of therapeutic massage that combines elements of Japanese acupressure, acupuncture and traditional Chinese medicine, Taoist philosophy and Qijong exercises.

These methods are used to treat circulation problems (high blood pressure, varicose veins), respiratory problems (asthma, bronchitis, sinusitis) or nervous system problems (headache, insomnia, sciatica, depression, back pain, spondylosis), diabetes, rheumatism (arthritis rheumatoid arthritis, muscle and bone), intestinal diseases (peptic ulcer, constipation, haemorrhoids), heart and skin problems (dermatitis, eczema, herpes, psoriasis).

 

Send to a friend
Printable version
CLOSE X
See also
For Fr Tom, abducted in Yemen, Holy Thursday prayer and adoration for the martyrs
21/03/2016 14:57
Acupuncture good for the back, even when fake
26/09/2007
Indian Church to keep its promises in the fight against AIDS
30/11/2005
A “silent tsunami” hitting weakest refugees
20/06/2008
Praying at Our Lady of Tewatte to heal sick people and a sick nation
27/08/2007