Skin ADV
08 February 2016
AsiaNews.it Twitter AsiaNews.it Facebook
Geographic areas




  • > Africa
  • > Central Asia
  • > Europe
  • > Middle East
  • > Nord America
  • > North Asia
  • > South Asia
  • > South East Asia
  • > South West Asia
  • > Sud America
  • > East Asia

  • mediazioni e arbitrati, risoluzione alternativa delle controversie e servizi di mediazione e arbitrato


    » 01/19/2007, 00.00

    CHINA

    Death of a sea from industrial waste and coastal build-up



    Billions of tonnes of untreated liquid and solid waste are killing the Bohai Sea. The authorities are spending billions of yuan to clean up the sea but plan also more factories and larger harbours. Here is the third in a series of articles about China’s environmental crisis.

    Beijing (AsiaNews/Agencies) – Mao Zedong chose the place to dive into the sea and it still has a beach resort for party bosses. It is the Bohai Sea. But in 2006 alone some 1.58 billion tonnes of water contaminated by chemical substances were dumped into it. Fish are dying and a massive algal bloom, or red tide, has invaded it. Still local government is planning more miles of factories and harbour facilities.

    The Bohai Sea is China’s most polluted sea according to the State Oceanic Administration. Every year it absorbs nearly 5.7 billion tonnes of sewage and 2 million tonnes of other solid waste—43 out of 52 rivers flowing into it are severely polluted.

    And 80 per cent of the 112 discharge outlets in Tianjin, Shandong, Liaoning and Hebei frequently discharged chemicals, industrial waste and sewage into the sea.

    The bay has also been hit more frequently by red tides. They consume the waste that flows into the coastal waters from rivers and streams, and poison the water and choke off sea life.

    China’s State Environmental Protection Administration spent 21 billion yuan cleaning it up during the 10th Five-Year Plan as part of a 15-year national clean-up campaign; it plans to spend another 28.6 billion yuan from last year to 2010. But results so far have been limited.

    Qikou, a village near Tianjin on the Bay of Bohai, had a rich fishing industry. Last summer an unprecedented discharge of industrial sewage from the upper reaches of the Canglangqu River. Red algae covered the coast, remove oxygen and cut off sunlight, killing marine life. Thousands of crabs, shrimp and fish died.

    More than 600 hectares of fish farms were affected, according to village Chief Chen Lianfu, invaded by effluents from chemical plants, paper mills and leather factories in Henan, Shanxi, Shandong and Hebei.

    Coastal sea fishing had to be suspended for the first time in years in September, and hundreds of fishermen were left jobless.

    Shops in Beijing and Tianjin now refuse to buy local fish.

    Qikou residents enjoyed an average income of 3,760 yuan in 2003, but average incomes dropped to a few hundred yuan last year.

    Mr Chen told Hong Kong’s South China Morning Post that most residents had to take out loans to build their fish farms and now cannot continue.

    "We will continue to petition the governments in Huanghua, Cangzhou and Hebei, and call for immediate action to stop pollution," Mr Chen said. "Otherwise, we will have no way to make a living. But first of all we must seek compensation for those living in great difficulty."

    Despite the situation Tianjin plans to reclaim about 250 sq km from the sea to build dozens of industrial projects, including a power plant, a fishing port and several industrial parks. Hebei will reclaim up to 310 sq km of land to build the port of Caofeidian, only about 60km from Tianjin's port. And the port of Huanghua is expected to reclaim another 300 sq km from the Bohai Sea.

    Tao Jianhua, an environmental engineering expert from Tianjin University, said such plans will have serious consequences for the environment and marine life.

    “People used to think land-based pollution would have little impact on the sea, but this is very wrong,” she said. This kind of pollution is the result of “irrational development,” Professor Tao said.

    In her opinion local authorities in Tianjin have yet to realise the importance of a balance between economic development and ecological preservation.

    In the meantime, local farmers have little choice but to use contaminated water. But they don't eat their own produce, which will be sold in Beijing and Tianjin. The worst part is that no one can tell whether it is from a polluted area,” Tao said. (PB)

    e-mail this to a friend Printable version










    See also

    20/01/2007 CHINA
    The Government: drinking water for 32 million farmers, but ten times more are left without
    Clean drinking water promised by 2010, but 320 million are left without and a further 190 million forced to drink toxic water. Beijing’s interventions are hindered by industrial pollution and the lack of cooperation from local governments who focus on economic growth to the detriment of the environment. The Bohai sea is in Danger. Fourth Dossier on pollution.

    19/09/2009 CHINA
    No way out of China’s cancer villages
    China’s massive industrial boom has poisoned land, water and entire villages. In Shangba, water is orange coloured. Cancer is wrecking havoc to residents’ health. With neither compensation nor medical treatment, they cannot leave, victims of progress that brought them no benefits.

    17/01/2007 CHINA
    Shandong farmers use water for drinking and irrigation from a river as black as ink
    Hundreds of thousands of farmers must use filthy water for drinking and irrigation. The economies of entire farming and fishing villages have been destroyed. Authorities do not seem concerned and do not stop the pollution or help locals whilst local governments are more interested in increasing industrial developments. First part in a series of articles on China’s pollution crisis.

    26/04/2007 CHINA
    Pollution: Fujian farmers destroy machines of 11 factories
    Damages amount to 11 million dollars. Meanwhile the Harbin authorities evacuate 5 thousand people after a chlorine leak contaminates local water system.

    24/02/2011 CHINA
    Millions of hectares of Chinese farmland polluted with heavy metals
    Twelve million tonnes of grain must be destroyed. Land and water sources are polluted with heavy metals and other toxic substance. The government pledges quick action, but does not provide details. Given its current drought, China’s food self-sufficiency is in jeopardy.



    Editor's choices

    CHINA – VATICAN
    Global Times: the pope should accept the independence of the Chinese Church



    After 24 hours of silence, China’s media today published excerpts, comments and editorials about Pope Francis’ interview with Asia Times. Although the pope did not address religious issues or Church problems, many saw the interview as an attempt to improve diplomatic relations between China and the Vatican, and advised Francis to accept Mao Zedong’s "three principles of independence" (theology, administration, jurisdiction), which would leave the power to appoint bishops in the hands of the Party. The People's Daily’s Global Times publishes an editorial on the issue.


    INDIA – PHILIPPINES
    Archbishop of Guwahati: In Asia religion is not dying, the faithful take strength from the Eucharist



    Mgr Menamparampil is among the speakers at the International Eucharistic Congress in Cebu, Philippines. He was also a conflict mediator between various ethnic groups. He told AsiaNews about the value of the Congress for the Catholic Church in Asia and how people can bear witness the Gospel today, even amid tensions and violence of those who "hate us." "with the same pain in our hearts that we descend to our depths during a Eucharistic adoration."


    AsiaNews IS ALSO A MONTHLY!

    AsiaNews monthly magazine (in Italian) is free.
     

    SUBSCRIBE NOW

    News feed

    Canale RSScanale RSS 

    Add to Google









     

    Terra Santa Banner

    2003 © All rights reserved - AsiaNews C.F. e P.Iva: 00889190153 - GLACOM®