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  • mediazioni e arbitrati, risoluzione alternativa delle controversie e servizi di mediazione e arbitrato


    » 09/18/2012, 00.00

    CHINA - JAPAN

    Economy first casualty of Diaoyu/Senkaku dispute



    Beijing and Tokyo continue to fuel tensions over disputed islands. Dozens of demonstrations take place in China, including terrorist-like acts against Japanese diplomatic missions. Both governments want to divert domestic attention from their main problems: political succession in China and economic crisis in Japan. Meanwhile, trade is getting worse.

    Beijing (AsiaNews) - On the 81st anniversary of the incident that led to Japan's invasion of China, relations between the two countries are worsening. The dispute over the Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands does not seem to be abating. In fact, the two governments appear to have their own reasons to up the ante. China wants to distract people from the upcoming Communist Party congress, which should put a new set of leaders in power. Japan needs greater national cohesion at a time when it is undergoing a major economic and energy policy shift.

    On 18 September 1931, Japan blew up a railway in Manchuria, blaming it on Chinese dissidents. Remembered as the 'Mukden Incident,' it became the pretext to invade northeast China and divide China's republican government. Japanese troops remained until 1945 when the forces of Mao and the Republican government drove them out.

    Today, in the name of national sovereignty, both nations are letting demonstrations and violent acts to take place.

    When two Japanese activists landed on the disputed islands, Beijing asked Tokyo for immediate explanations, warning it would not tolerate such actions. Meanwhile, in the islands' waters, six Chinese patrol boats are protecting a thousand fishing boats.

    It is not clear what the islands are worth, but some experts believe they are strategically located astride some major maritime routes. Others consider them important because of their fishing grounds or their vast seabed gas reserves.

    In 2008, Beijing and Tokyo had agreed to develop the area jointly, but they never saw the accord through.

    Anti-Japanese demonstrations have multiplied in many of China's cities. Police have tended to be restrained, allowing thousands of protesters to throw rocks at shops and Japanese diplomatic offices.

    For some, this self-restraint reflects the government's desire to distract ordinary Chinese from the upcoming party congress, which should crown the rise of the Communist regime's 'fifth generation.'

    Japan is also facing protests. A man was arrested in the southern city of Fukuoka for throwing two smoke bombs at the local Chinese consulate.

    Yuya Fujita, a 21-year-old construction worker, reportedly told police that he lobbed the smoke bombs "in a protest against China". No one was hurt.

    Japanese authorities are also not in a hurry to stop the anti-Chinese wave. After announcing it was going to phase nuclear energy over the next 30 years, the government can expect a major negative impact on economic growth forecast at a time when new elections are on the horizon.

    However, Japanese companies have paid a price. Nissan Motors lost 2.5 per cent, Honda dropped 1.4 per cent and Fast Retailing 4.9 per cent.

    Panasonic shut down its plant in Qingdao as Canon did the same to three of its plants. Honda and Nissan stopped production for two days, Mazda for four. Seven & Holdings closed 13 supermarkets and 198 outlets. Sony told its employees to avoid non-essential travel to China.

    Japan also faces a structural problem. Over the years, its companies have heavily invested in China, despite the historic rivalry between the two countries. Government-guaranteed cheap labour and the yen's high value made it more convenient to manufacture on the mainland.

    Now Chinese protests and nationalism could force Japanese business to change their strategy.

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    See also

    10/10/2012 CHINA - JAPAN - IMF
    Islands not only reason for China IMF snub
    The governor of China's central bank, who was set to deliver the closing lecture at Tokyo IMF meeting, cancelled speech and attendance. Using the diplomatic row over the Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands, Beijing is showing its irritation over the fact that it is not included in a basket of currencies used in world economic transactions.

    17/08/2009 JAPAN
    Japanese economy out of recession . Maybe
    During the April-June period, the national growth up by 0.9%, but there are those who believe it is only a consequence of robust funding provided by the state. Meanwhile, the Tokyo stock exchange suffers losses, confirming the doubts of the financial market and investors.

    09/06/2016 09:57:00 JAPAN - CHINA
    China Sea, Beijing warship in "adjacent waters" to disputed islands

    A nearly 4 thousand ton "Jiankai" class war ship touches territorial limits surrounding the Senkaku / Diaoyu and is sighted by a Japanese destroyer. Tokyo calls the ambassador in Beijing to protest, the Ministry of Defence stresses "concern" about the act.



    27/08/2013 JAPAN - CHINA
    Beijing flies into Senkaku / Diaoyu airspace fueling tension in East China Sea
    The aircraft coasted the airspace of the archipelago that is disputed between China and Japan. The Japanese Defense Ministry: "We are ready to do whatever is necessary to protect our territories." Chinese Foreign Ministry: "On this basis there can be no constructive dialogue to resolve the issue."

    22/12/2008 JAPAN
    Japanese exports tumble, trade deficit grows
    Exports to the United States and Europe in free fall, but also in Asia. Automobiles and electronics the sectors hardest hit, Toyota forecasts first loss in 71 years. The government approves new aid for families and businesses.



    Editor's choices

    CHINA - VATICAN
    Vatican silence over Shanghai’s Mgr Ma Daqin causing confusion and controversy

    Bernardo Cervellera

    For some, Mgr Ma’s blog post praising the Patriotic Association and acknowledging his mistakes is nothing but “dirt”. For others, he chose humiliation for the “sake of his diocese”. Many wonder why the Holy See has remained silent about the article’s content and the bishop’s persecution. Some suspect the Vatican views the episode in positive terms. Yet, the Ma Daqin affair raises a major question. Has Benedict XVI’s Letter to Chinese Catholics (which describes the Patriotic Association as “incompatible with Catholic doctrine”) been abolished? If it has, who did it? A journey of compromises without truth is full of risks.


    CHINA – VATICAN
    Mgr Ma Daqin: the text of his “confession”

    Mons. Taddeo Ma Daqin

    Four years after quitting the Chinese Patriotic Catholic Association, the bishop of Shanghai “admits” his faults on his blog, praising the organisation that controls the Church. We publish his article, almost in its entirety. Translation by AsiaNews.


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