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  • mediazioni e arbitrati, risoluzione alternativa delle controversie e servizi di mediazione e arbitrato


    » 10/27/2006, 00.00

    INDIA

    India's private universities to open doors to outcastes



    The country's main private educational institutions agree to reservations for Dalit and Adivasi students. The government is now working on a bill that would preserve the universities' autonomy and maintain their funding.

    New Delhi (AsiaNews) – For the first time India's biggest private universities are setting aside quotas for students from the bottom of the caste system, i.e. members of the so-called Scheduled Castes (SC, Dalit), Scheduled Tribes (ST, Adivasi) e Other Backward Classes (OBC).

    Human Resources Development Minister Arjun Singh reached the agreement in New Delhi with the vice chancellors of seven universities. In exchange, the universities got two promises from the government, namely that reservation should not affect their autonomy and that quotas will be implemented in a phased manner.
    Several issues still need to be ironed out; a crucial one being the free structure because students coming from the special categories may not be able to pay the kind of high fees the private institutes charge.

    Mr Singh pointed out that the deal was "unanimously agreed" and that the accepted proposal will be turned into law.
    The government wanted to clinch a consensus before adopting any law imposing quotas to avoid a backlash that might have pushed universities to hinder the law as well as challenge it before the courts.

    According to the 2001 census, literacy among Tribals stands at 47 per cent against a national average of 64 per cent. Scheduled castes and tribes represent 24 per cent of the Indian population.

    The Mandal Commission, which was set up to a mandate to "identify the socially or educationally backward". In its 1980 report it determined that 52 of the population belong to the backward classes.

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    See also

    17/05/2011 INDIA
    Christian journalist appointed to lower castes and minority programme monitoring body
    A.J. Philip joins the Assessment and Monitoring Authority, which looks at government programmes for backward classes and minorities. Through him, the needs of the poor will be heard, priest says.

    20/07/2007 INDIA
    The government should decide whether Christian Dalits are entitled to same benefits as other Dalits
    Hindu and Sikh Dalits enjoy benefits based on Scheduled Caste status but Christians are excluded. Advocacy group raises the issue before the Supreme Court which calls on the government to state its position. An expert with a commission of the Bishops’ Conference expresses his views.

    10/05/2007 INDIA
    Among Dalits, women are the most humiliated, laments the Indian Church
    In welcoming a resolution before the US Congress on India’s caste system, the Bishops’ Conference of India insists on the role education for women can play in Dalit emancipation.

    14/02/2005 INDIA
    Hopes for the rights of Dalit Christians
    Supreme Court will consider the constitutional status of Dalit converts to Christianity hitherto marginalised and rejected by Indian society.

    10/03/2008 INDIA
    Upper caste and Dalit Catholics clash, police shoot and kill
    In Tamil Nadu upper caste Catholics attack Dalits, destroying dozens of their homes. They are “guilty” of demanding a separate parish. Police move in and fire at attackers.



    Editor's choices

    CHINA - VATICAN
    Vatican silence over Shanghai’s Mgr Ma Daqin causing confusion and controversy

    Bernardo Cervellera

    For some, Mgr Ma’s blog post praising the Patriotic Association and acknowledging his mistakes is nothing but “dirt”. For others, he chose humiliation for the “sake of his diocese”. Many wonder why the Holy See has remained silent about the article’s content and the bishop’s persecution. Some suspect the Vatican views the episode in positive terms. Yet, the Ma Daqin affair raises a major question. Has Benedict XVI’s Letter to Chinese Catholics (which describes the Patriotic Association as “incompatible with Catholic doctrine”) been abolished? If it has, who did it? A journey of compromises without truth is full of risks.


    CHINA – VATICAN
    Mgr Ma Daqin: the text of his “confession”

    Mons. Taddeo Ma Daqin

    Four years after quitting the Chinese Patriotic Catholic Association, the bishop of Shanghai “admits” his faults on his blog, praising the organisation that controls the Church. We publish his article, almost in its entirety. Translation by AsiaNews.


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