04/22/2017, 13.44
INDIA
Send to a friend

Missionaries of Charity visit families, the sick and dying on the Andaman Islands

by Santosh Digal

The Sisters of Mother Teresa arrived in the capital of Port Blair in 1994. Four of them currently work on the archipelago, helping the sick and dying at their time of need as well as supporting the poor by funding their children’s education.

Port Blair (AsiaNews) – Four Missionaries of Charity (a congregation founded by St Teresa of Kolkata) are involved in charity work on the Andaman Islands, helping families in trouble and visiting them every day, bringing a word of comfort to the sick and dying and assisting them in their time of need, supporting the poor by paying school fees for their children.

One of them, Sister Rose Ann, 50, spoke to AsiaNews about her daily work in favour of local people. In particular, she noted that she and her sisters not only offer material help but also provide spiritual support because what counts is "experiencing God’s love."

The Sisters of Mother Teresa came to the Indian archipelago in 1994, in Port Blair. Today they have created two communities, one in the capital and another in Diglipur.

"We visit families every day,” Sister Rose Ann said. “We help Catholics in prayers. We make them understand the importance of the Holy Eucharist and the sacrament of Reconciliation. We pay particular attention to families with difficulties and to their neighbours. We help them forgive and receive forgiveness, because this way they can experience God’s love."

In Diglipur, the Sisters run a home for the sick and dying. "This year we welcomed a man who became bedridden. With the Lord’s grace and loving care, he healed and resumed walking. He returned home a happy man."

At present, the facility accommodates ten men and four women. "We also have two unmarried parents and their six children. We are helping them to build a house. We give them material support and pay for the children’s education."

The Missionaries also have a mobile clinic to "treat the sick in distant villages. People come to us for medicines, and trust very much our care."

The Sisters also visit 13 Christian base communities. "We held a novena of prayer and prepared people for reconciliation."

In three other Catholic communities, the nuns organise centres "in which we encourage the faithful to devote themselves truly to Jesus' heart and to recite the Rosary in the family. We pray with them the rosary of Divine Mercy, listen to their problems and sustain them materially at all time. We teach catechism in the villages."

"Finally,” said Sr Rose Ann, “we visit hospitals, talk to the patients and pray with them for a quick recovery. We help them accept suffering as a gift from God."

Send to a friend
Printable version
CLOSE X
See also
Pope talks about the Middle East, the Holy Land and the food crisis with Bush
13/06/2008
Sister Parmar: caring for orphans is a ‘life-giving experience”
06/05/2017 16:01
Vatican sees roots of economic crisis in a lack of ethical reference points
05/05/2010
Orissa: two nuns accused of ill-treatment released
31/07/2007
The environment, respect of man’s dignity and recognition of spiritual values are today’s challe
02/05/2007