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» 02/07/2005
PAKISTAN
Shari'ah Pakistani style: no music, dancing and images of women but mosques everywhere
by Qaiser Felix
In the North-Western Frontier Province Islamic fundamentalism and Shari'ah are bolstered. Music in public places and images of women in advertising are to be banned.

Islamabad (AsiaNews) – A new attempt is underway to reinforce Islamic fundamentalism at the expense of religious freedom and religious minorities.  Mian Nadir Shah, a Member of the North-Western Frontier (NWFP) Provincial Assembly, tabled two private bills that would ban music and dancing in public places and educational institutions and using photographs of women in advertising. In both cases, the offences would be punishable by up to five years in prison and a fine of up to 5, 000 and 10, 000 rupees respectively. The accused would have no right to bail.

The proposal is backed by the NWFP's ruling coalition. Some leaders of the Muttahida Majlis-i-Amal (MMA), an alliance of six Muslim religious parties, said that the proposed "bills would not limit citizens' freedom".

Minister Sirajul Haq told reporters that the proposed ban on music and dancing would apply only to public places—including bus terminals, commuter vehicles, hotels and other places—where they can bother people or sites—like educational institutions—which were meant to spread culture.

A MMA provincial spokesman, Mufti Kafayetullah, said that the treasury benches would support all those bills which promoted Islamic values in the area. At the same time, the MMA has told luxury hotel owners to fire their female employees. Recently, some of its activists destroyed expensive advertisement boards.

Islamisation is not something new to this province. In June 2003, the NWFP Provincial Assembly unanimously adopted the Shari'ah Bill which made Shari'ah the basis of legislation.

Last year the MMA-controlled legislature passed the Hisba Act, placing Muslim clerics, acting as mohtaseb or Shari'ah judges, as heads of district councils, which will be run according to Shari'ah law. Their decisions cannot be challenged in non-Shari'ah courts.

The new law also requires the establishment of mosques in all government buildings, and ultimately in all public buildings including shopping centres, schools and hospitals.

According to human rights groups and liberal politicians, the legislation will strengthen extremist elements throughout Pakistan, leading to an increase in religious hatred and discrimination and the misuse of Islamic laws against minorities.

By discouraging foreign investment, it will also hurt the economic development of the NWFP.

And, in the end, greater reliance on the shari'ah will lead to the eventual talibanisation of the NWFP and the strengthening of groups tied to al-Qaeda in Pakistan.

 


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See also
04/11/2005 PAKISTAN
Protestant clergyman and driver killed, bodies mutilated
by Qaiser Felix
10/12/2004 PAKISTAN
Violence against the mentally disabled accused of blasphemy
by Qaiser Felix
12/10/2004 PAKISTAN – HUMAN RIGHTS
Religious minorities, persecuted and marginalised
by Qaiser Felix
03/23/2010 PAKISTAN
Punjab: Christian burned alive dies, Christian community calls for justice
by Fareed Khan
08/10/2013 PAKISTAN
Faisalabad: Christians and Muslims together to combat human rights violations
by Shafique Khokhar

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by Giulio Aleni / (a cura di) Gianni Criveller
pp. 176
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