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mediazioni e arbitrati, risoluzione alternativa delle controversie e servizi di mediazione e arbitrato
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» 06/30/2011
VIETNAM - CHINA
South China Sea, Vietnamese analysts: Beijing leaders "greedy and aggressive '
by Paul N. Hung
Former executives and historians say that the maritime borders crisis is the result of the Chinese government’s erroneous economic strategies. The "red greedy capitalists" have transformed the economic market into a "battlefield" and use violence "on their own people and other nations." Chinese naval exercises continue, which Beijing terms "routine".

Hanoi (AsiaNews) - The crisis in the South China Sea is the result of the “mistaken” strategies of the communist government in Beijing in the economic field. The ruling class is "greedy and aggressive" and tries to offload their failures on neighboring nations, especially the smaller ones in Southeast Asia. It applies the same criteria marked by "violence", both towards its own citizens and those of other states. This is the conclusion of historians, analysts and former executives in Vietnam contacted by AsiaNews, who attribute the latest crisis in Asia to China's aggression, greed and expansionism. Meanwhile, Beijing defines the naval exercises in recent weeks as "routine" and denies there are links with recent clashes off the coast of Vietnam and the Philippines.

A history professor points out that "poor choices in the economy" have led China's communist leaders to become "greedy and aggressive" towards "small nations of Southeast Asia." He is echoed by a former executive of Hanoi, according to whom Beijing is "imposing its erroneous domestic policies on its people."

Even the historians remember how the Chinese Communist Party, founded in 1921, have held the reins of governance for "too long" and no longer have adequate responses for the times that have profoundly changed. "They have become - says an expert scholar of American and Vietnamese history, - despotic leaders, who do not allow their people democracy" so as to become "red greedy capitalists" who have transformed the economic market into a "battlefield". The unanimous opinion of analysts in Vietnam that emerges is that the leaders in Beijing are "seeking personal benefits" using the name of the Communist Party and will continue to use "violence on the people and other nations."

To settle disputes in the South China Sea on 26 June, the U.S. Senate passed a motion inviting the countries concerned to promote the "process of multilateral negotiations" and to reach agreements in order to preserve "peace" in the Asia-Pacific. However, the Chinese government is only open to bilateral talks with each of the countries involved, calling on the U.S. to "stop meddling" in issues that do not concern them while it continues to claim large portions of territory, which according to international treaties, are not under its jurisdiction.

And to those who propose a Code of Conduct, capable of settling claims on a global level, Beijing responds with a series of naval military exercises, termed "routine" and without any connection to the recent crisis. In June, the Chinese navy carried out six exercises, while joint maneuvers - lasting 11 days - between the U.S. and the Philippine Navy continue.

Among the nations of the Asia-Pacific region, China has the most extensive claims in the South China Sea, which includes the uninhabited Spratly and Paracel Islands, with rich fishing grounds and important oil and gas reserves. Beijing’s claims also reflect its strategic goal of hegemonic control over trade and mineral development, above all oil and natural gas. Chinese demands have not gone unchallenged. Contenders include Vietnam, the Philippines, Malaysia, Brunei and Taiwan, as well as the United States, which has its own strategic interests in the region.

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See also
03/26/2013 VIETNAM - CHINA
Chinese ship hits Vietnamese fishing boat, tension soars between Hanoi and Beijing
07/06/2011 VIETNAM
Vietnamese protest against the "tyrannical" expansion of China
by Paul N. Hung
03/21/2012 CHINA
Beijing to boost surveillance in East and South China Seas
06/04/2011 VIETNAM - CHINA - PHILIPPINES
Vietnamese take to streets against Beijing’s incursions in the South China Sea
07/30/2010 CHINA – VIETNAM – US
China’s claims in South China Sea cause sparks with United States and Vietnam

Editor's choices
EGYPT - ISLAM
What Tayeb and Sisi said is big step towards a revolution in Islam
by Samir Khalil SamirThe grand imam of Al-Azhar slammed literalist interpretations of the Qur'an and the Sunnah, as fundamentalists and Islamic terrorists do. He supports the urgent need for Islam's reform, especially in terms of teaching lay people and clerics. He also calls for an end to mutual excommunication (takfir) between Sunnis and Shias. Egyptian President al-Sisi chose to fight the Islamic state group after it beheaded 21 Coptic Christians, whom he called "Egyptian citizens" with full rights.
SAUDI ARABIA - ISLAM
For head of Al-Azhar, religious education reform is needed to stop Islamic extremismFor Ahmed al-Tayeb, it is urgent to come up with new educational programmes to avoid "corrupt interpretations" of the Qur'an and Sunnah. Islamic terrorism undermines the unity of the Muslim world. He blames Mideast tensions on a "new global colonialism allied to world Zionism". a speech by the Saudi king is read at the conference.
HONG KONG - CHINA - VATICAN
It looks like someone is trying to shout us down
by Card. Joseph Zen Ze-kiunThe widespread optimism concerning the dialogue between the Holy See and China is largely groundless. Some Chinese bishops unable to speak freely are asked "leading" questions. The key issues remain unresolved, namely episcopal appointments and the fate of the Chinese Catholic Patriotic Association. Benedict XVI's Letter to Chinese Catholics, also cited by Pope Francis, provides guidelines. No agreement is better than a bad agreement. What happened to Msgr. Cosma Shi Enxiang and Msgr. James Su Zhimin? Hong Kong's bishop emeritus, champion of religious freedom in China, delivers a vibrant reflection.

Dossier

by Giulio Aleni / (a cura di) Gianni Criveller
pp. 176
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