30 November, 2015 AsiaNews.it Twitter AsiaNews.it Facebook            

Help AsiaNews | About us | P.I.M.E. | | RssNewsletter | Mobile

mediazioni e arbitrati, risoluzione alternativa delle controversie e servizi di mediazione e arbitrato

e-mail this to a friend printable version

» 04/23/2008
Ulema against the government in defence of “heretical’ Ahmadis
Nahdlatul Ulama leaders oppose a draft bill that would outlaw the Ahmadi sect, which does not recognise Muhammad as the last prophet. They also plan to field 20,000 young people to defend Ahmadis from attacks by extremists.

Jakarta (AsiaNews) – The leaders of Nahdlatul Ulama, Indonesia’s largest Islamic organisation, have expressed their opposition to a government proposal that would ban the Ahmadi sect and said they would protect the group from any abuse. The sect, which recognises Mirza Ghulam Ahmad as the last prophet in Islam instead of Muhammad, is considered heretical in many Muslim countries, including Pakistan and Saudi Arabia.

The ulemas, who have gathered at the home of a famous imam, Habib Syarief Utsman Yahya, are providing for the physical protection of the Ahmadi “until the current state of affairs continues,” i.e. as long as there are violent demonstrations by Islamic extremists in Jakarta and Java Province demanding immediate government action against those “who desecrate Muhammad.”

For its part the government has drafted a bill that would outlaw the sect. The proposal, submitted by the Council for the Control of Mystical Religions, is being examined by legal experts within the Interior Affairs Ministry. In the meantime fears about anti-Ahmadi violence are growing.

After the latest ulema meeting, Syarief said: “It is the normal duty of police to protect and defend Indonesian citizens, but given this particular case we are ready to back them with our groups of young people. We can field at least 20,000 young people.”

Nahdlatul Ulama plans setting up self-defence groups around residential areas where Ahmadis live, mainly in Jalaksana and Majalengka, Java Province.

“We must fight this mindset. The government project cannot be accepted because it openly violates freedom of religion which is guaranteed by the constitution,” the Imam Syarief said. “Ahmadis have the same rights before the law as everybody else. If they take action against the government we would support them.”

Indonesia is the biggest Muslim country in the world. Out of a population of 219 million, 87.2 per cent are Muslim; 9 per cent are Christians. Ahmadis are about 0.2 per cent of the total.

e-mail this to a friend printable version

See also
08/02/2005 INDONESIA
Gus Dur against fundamentalist threat in Indonesia
by Mathias Hariyadi
06/04/2008 INDONESIA
More than 50 Islamic Defender Front extremists arrested
03/05/2011 INDONESIA
Moderate Muslims and human rights activists defend Ahmadis
by Mathias Hariyadi
10/26/2005 INDONESIA
Five deaths in clashes between Muslim sect and police in Sulawesi
03/19/2011 INDONESIA
Ahmadi leaders call for pluralistic and tolerant Indonesia
by Mathias Hariyadi

Editor's choices
Paris Massacre highlights the failure of Muslim integration in Europe
by Catherine FieldThe attack in the heart of France highlights the crisis of Europe’s model of coexistence. Social unrest, poverty and marginalisation feed youth extremism and radicalisation. A New Zealander journalist, expert on expertise in religion and interfaith dialogue, talks about it after undertaking a journey through the French Muslim world.
For Nîmes imam, Islam should not be held hostage by extremists
by Hochine DrouicheFrench imams condemn the Paris terrorist attacks and disassociate themselves from violence committed in "the name of our religion." At the same time, they ask Muslim communities to dare leading a life of dialogue and friendship with Europeans, without fear or arrogance. For centuries, Muslims have ruled out reason from their religious life. The vice president of French imams bears witness.
AsiaNews marks 12 years: Persecution and hope
by Bernardo CervelleraDespite a worldwide increase of ignorance, indifference and superficiality, many signs of love and hope resist even in the most gloomy situations: the Iraqi mother who gives birth to her child in a refugee camp and smiles even though she has nothing; the Indonesian Muslim mother who blesses her son who became a Christian and a priest; the Chinese Christian families that welcome children thrown away because of the one-child law.


Copyright © 2003 AsiaNews C.F. 00889190153 All rights reserved. Content on this site is made available for personal, non-commercial use only. You may not reproduce, republish, sell or otherwise distribute the content or any modified or altered versions of it without the express written permission of the editor. Photos on AsiaNews.it are largely taken from the internet and thus considered to be in the public domain. Anyone contrary to their publication need only contact the editorial office which will immediately proceed to remove the photos.