Pyongyang: We will send our troops to the southern border

The order was issued by Kim Yo-jong, sister of North Korean leader Kim Jong-un. New response to the launch of propaganda flyers from the South. Seoul: we are monitoring the situation together with the United States. Analysts: the Kim family raises tension to obtain concessions.

 


Seoul (AsiaNews / Agencies) - North Korea is ready to send its troops to the demilitarized zone that divides North Korea from the South. Kim Yo-jong, leader Kim Jong-un's sister , issued the order on the 13th June according to the official Pyongyang regime KCNA news agency.

The two Koreas are technically at war, given that the two countries never signed a peace treaty at the end of the 1950 to 1953 war.

Pyongyang's threat is a further response to the launch of propaganda leaflets on North Korean territory carried out by groups of dissidents sheltered in South Korea. On June 9, North Korea had interrupted military and diplomatic communications with Seoul as retaliation for the launch - via balloons - of defamatory leaflets.

According to several analysts, in addition to shifting the attention of internal public opinion from the country's economic problems, exacerbated by the coronavirus pandemic, Pyongyang is pressing on the South to express its dissatisfaction with the United States. Kim Jong-un met with US President Donald Trump in 2018 and 2019, without obtaining the cancellation or suspension of international sanctions for his country's nuclear and missile programs. As a precondition, Washington demands North Korean disarmament.

In this context, Kim Jong-un would be leaving room for his sister, tasked with raising tension with the South, to intervene later and obtain greater concessions in future negotiations with Washington and Seoul. This tactic is often used by the Kim family, in power since the end of the Second World War.

The South Korean Armed Forces said today they were monitoring the movements of North Korean troops together with the United States. Pyongyang's threats weaken the position of South Korean President Moon Jae-in, who is determined to establish "irreversible peace" on the Korean peninsula, a re-edition of the Sunshine Policy inaugurated 20 years ago by its liberal predecessors.

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