26 May 2017
AsiaNews.it Twitter AsiaNews.it Facebook
Geographic areas




  • > Africa
  • > Central Asia
  • > Europe
  • > Middle East
  • > Nord America
  • > North Asia
  • > South Asia
  • > South East Asia
  • > South West Asia
  • > Sud America
  • > East Asia


  • » 10/28/2005, 00.00

    CHINA – ASIA

    In China no information about the dangers of the avian flu



    Local media are not covering the issue, especially in the areas where it is most needed. International health organisations are concerned. Hunan girl thought to have died of the bird flu died of pneumonia instead.

    Beijing (AsiaNews/Agencies) – In China little information on the dangers of bird flu contagion is being made available to the public, especially in rural areas where risks are the highest and where action is needed right away.

    Health authorities announced that the girl who died in Hunan province had pneumonia with acute respiratory distress syndrome—not the bird flu.

    However, "we don't know what tests have been conducted," World Health Organisation (WHO) spokeswoman in Beijing Aphaluck Bhatiasevi said. "We're waiting for official information from the health ministry in Beijing."

    The situation in China is worrisome not only because there have been three outbreaks in one week in three, distant places, but also because the news are trickling in late and in many places people are left without information. Money for the vaccine is also scarce.

    In Anhui province poultry was found dead on October 21, but the government announced it only three days later. In Henan an outbreak started on October 13, but again the authorities waited ten days before confirming it.

    The government has now announced that local officials will inform the central authorities within three hours of any case.

    Many observers though complain that local papers and TV stations are not covering the outbreaks. This helps maintain the poultry prices stable but does little for prevention.

    "If people are left in the dark that can create problems," said Noureddin Mona, China representative of the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO). "Disclosure of information will help public confidence that the government is doing what's needed."

    "Unless local people—farmers, doctors, officials—are well-informed, it's difficult to have early detention," said Julie Hall, who oversees WHO's fight against bird flu in China.
    In Shenzhen health authorities have adopted a series of measures to prevent an outbreak, but farmers complain that they have to buy the vaccine.

    For many observers, to avoid the spread of the infection, the government should compensate farmers and provide economic aid to pay for animal vaccination as well as cover the medical expenses of those who get sick.

    In rural areas poultry is free-range which puts them in contact with migratory birds.

    Thailand. Authorities are concerned about the impact of the avian flu on tourism, a mainstay of the country's economy. During the 2003 SARS outbreak, tourist arrivals dropped by 17 per cent.

    Sri Lanka. Bird imports from Eastern Europe and some Asian countries have been banned. The country imports on an average 500,000 live birds per year as well as 3-4,000 tonnes of poultry meat.

    United Arab Emirates. FAO has agreed that the UAE will coordinate operations in the entire Persian Gulf area in case of an outbreak. Poultry imports from Asia, Romania and Turkey have been banned.

    Romania. A heron found dead a week ago on the border with Moldova was infected, authorities confirmed. (PB)

    e-mail this to a friend Printable version










    See also

    18/10/2005 ASIA
    Alarm bells sound in the West but the frontline against the bird flu is in Asia
    Increasingly, voices are raised arguing that the fight against the bird flu must be carried out where it started, in South-East Asia. Countries in the region should be provided with the necessary aid. New cases of infected birds are being reported.

    17/10/2005 ASIA
    Asian battleground key to beating bird flu virus
    For World Health Organisation, the virus appeared in South-East Asia and it is here that the risk of pandemic is the greatest. International aid is necessary to prevent it.

    10/11/2005 ASIA
    Bird flu suspected in new death in Indonesia
    Virus is spreading in China despite government measures. New outbreaks reported in Liaoning province and Vietnam.

    27/10/2005 ASIA
    Suspected new cases of bird flu in humans in China and Thailand
    No official confirmation has been forthcoming. International discussions over countermeasures and antiviral drugs continue. Concern is mounting over the danger that the virus might spread to Africa.

    17/02/2005 VIETNAM
    Ho Chi Minh City to slaughter all poultry because of bird flu
    Poultry farming will be allowed outside the city and under tight controls. British experts say disease underestimated: it affects more than the lungs.



    Editor's choices

    VATICAN
    Pope: together with the faithful in China on 24 May to celebrate Our Lady of Sheshan



    During the Regina Caeli, Pope Francis speaks about the World Day of Prayer for the Church in China, instituted by Benedict XVI. Chinese Catholics must make a “personal contribution to communion among believers and to harmony in the whole society." AsiaNews Symposium on the Church in China is set for this week. Francis appeals for peace in the Central African Republic, and for loving “one another following the example of the Lord”. For him, “Sometimes conflicts, pride, envy, and divisions leave a blotch on the beautiful face of the Church.” Five new cardinals will be named, including a bishop from Laos.


    VATICAN-CHINA
    May 24, 2017: 'China, the Cross is Red', AsiaNews Symposium

    Bernardo Cervellera

    The event will be held to mark the World Day of Prayer for the Church in China. A title with many meanings: the Cross is red from the blood of the martyrs; From attempts to suffocate the faith with state control; Bceause of the contribution of hope that Christianity gives to a population tired of materialism and consumerism that is seeking new moral criteria. The theme is also about the great and unexpected religious rebirth in the country. Guests to include: Card. Pietro Parolin, Msgr. Savio Hon, the sociologist of religions Richard Madsen, the testimonies of Chinese priests and laity.


    AsiaNews IS ALSO A MONTHLY!

    AsiaNews monthly magazine (in Italian) is free.
     

    SUBSCRIBE NOW

    News feed

    Canale RSScanale RSS 

    Add to Google









     

    IRAN 2016 Banner

    2003 © All rights reserved - AsiaNews C.F. e P.Iva: 00889190153 - GLACOM®