9 October, 2015 AsiaNews.it Twitter AsiaNews.it Facebook            

Help AsiaNews | About us | P.I.M.E. | | RssNewsletter | Mobile

mediazioni e arbitrati, risoluzione alternativa delle controversie e servizi di mediazione e arbitrato

e-mail this to a friend printable version

» 06/16/2012
Nepal's Hindu monarchy and a new revolution against democracy
by Kalpit Parajuli
Since 28 May, the country has been without a constitution and is likely to remain without a government. Thousands took to the streets on June 9 to denounce the government crisis and the collapse of the republic. The protest in favor of the monarchy is the biggest since the deposition of King Gyanendra in 2006. But the majority of Nepalese still believe in democracy.

Kathmandu (AsiaNews) - Nepali Hindus are ready for a new revolution to regain the throne for King Gyanendra Shah, deposed in 2006 after 11 years of civil war. According to the Hindu leader, the republic is not capable of running the country which for five years has been without a real government and a written constitution.

On June 9, more than 5 thousand people attended the pro-monarchy demonstration in Kathmandu organized by Rastrya Prajatantra Party (RPP - N) a political movement that campaigns for the return of the monarchy. For the first time since 2006, all the fringe political moovements that do not want democracy and the secular state participated in a demonstration against the republic. But according to media, most of Nepalese want democracy.

In his speech, Kamal Thapa, leader of the RPP-N and last Prime Minister of King Gyanendra, accused the political parties born after the fall of the monarchy of having failed. He maintains that the absence of a new constitution would legitimize the restoration of the old regime. "Now - he said - the only valid document is the Constitution of 1990, which provides for a constitutional monarchy based on the Hindu religion." "The republic - he added - failed on 28 May with the dissolution of the Constituent Assembly."

Several analysts point to a growth of Hindu populism especially among the parties that during the civil war fought alongside the monarchy and later were excluded from the formation of the new democratic state. The RPP-N draws strength from the current climate of distrust of political parties. The most to suffer from the political and social crisis is the Maoist party, considered by many to be the main culprit of the current crisis. Yesterday, nine members of the Madhesi People's Right Forum, the second party in the coalition government have resigned, because of incompatibility with the policies of the Maoists. They accuse Bijay Kumar Gachchadar, Deputy Prime Minister and leader of the Madhesi, of boycotting the requests to the people of the Terai region, to maintain power. The monarchists are hoping for a collapse of the Baburan Bhattarai government, to trigger new protests to reinstate the old regime. The current Prime Minister is accused of abuse of power for the planned elections for the Constituent Assembly on November 22 without consulting the other parties and may fall in coming months.

However, according to media, after seven years of democracy the majority of Nepalese are against the return of the monarchy and hopes for a new election for the Constituent Assembly. To support the secular state is mainly the ethnic and religious minorities, who are in power in the states most distant from the capital, but also richer in resources.

K.B. Rokaya, a Christian leader and activist for human rights warns "that the country can no longer turn back now. Restoration of the monarchy would mean a return to sectarian Hindu repression of minorities, and we will not suffer further discrimination." "Christians and other minorities - he adds - will no longer be discriminated against. The persecution of other religions must stop."

e-mail this to a friend printable version

See also
09/21/2012 NEPAL
Nepal, secular parties against King Gyanendra’s "religious" visit
by Kalpit Parajuli
06/04/2008 NEPAL
Pro-monarchy Hindus accept transition to republic
by Kalpit Parajuli
04/11/2012 NEPAL
Maoist government gains control of iconic Pashupatinath Hindu temple
by Kalpit Parajuli
05/07/2010 NEPAL
Hindu extremists attack Maoists, people protest in the capital
by Kalpit Parajuli
11/12/2009 NEPAL
Massive Maoist demonstration against government and police

Editor's choices
Pope: In “extremely difficult social and marital context”, Church called to carry out mission in fidelity, truth and charity.The opening Mass of the Synod on "The vocation and mission of the family in the Church and in the contemporary world," Pope Francis speaks of the paradoxes of global society: "power" accompanied by loneliness and helplessness." Today's man "ridicules" the family and love, but thirsts for it. The Church bears witness to indissoluble love, but must not forget to care and sustain "the man who falls or who errs." "A Church with closed doors betrays itself and its mission, and instead of being a bridge it becomes a barrier."
Singapore, Japan and Hong Kong in the top ten of the world economyWorld Economic Forum on competitiveness ranking published. Top three unchanged since last year: Switzerland, Singapore and the United States. Japan sixth, followed by Hong Kong. The world economy is slowing down compared to the previous decade, only exception- addition to China - India, which gains 16 positions.
Pope in the US: “We Christians, the Lord’s disciples, ask the families of the world to help us”In the last Mass of the World Meeting of Families in Philadelphia, Francis Pope highlights the daily "little gestures" that define the family, which is “the right place for faith to become life, and life to become faith". Gratitude, respect, and collaboration with families in which the Spirit operates can be found in every “family, people, region, or religion”.


Copyright © 2003 AsiaNews C.F. 00889190153 All rights reserved. Content on this site is made available for personal, non-commercial use only. You may not reproduce, republish, sell or otherwise distribute the content or any modified or altered versions of it without the express written permission of the editor. Photos on AsiaNews.it are largely taken from the internet and thus considered to be in the public domain. Anyone contrary to their publication need only contact the editorial office which will immediately proceed to remove the photos.