02/28/2012, 00.00
SOUTH KOREA
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Children of illegal immigrants "are children of God and the future of Korea"

by Joseph Yun Li-sun
The President of the Episcopal Commission for Migrants in South Korea, Bishop Lazarus You Heung-sik, told AsiaNews: "Korean society is hard for an outsider. But these people are the hope of us all. " The Church's commitment to inclusion and recognition of the rights of minors who live in the country.

Daejeojn (AsiaNews) - The children of immigrants "are God's children and a valuable resource for Korea and the world. This is why the Church is committed to them and their parents and wants the government to the same" says the bishop of Daejeon and president of the Episcopal Commission for Migrants in South Korea, Msgr. Lazarus You Heung-sik, "Immigrants living in Korea experience many difficulties, but the government is becoming more and more aware. The Church wants to find the causes of these difficulties and suggest alternatives. "

The appeal for migrants was born on the margins of the meeting of the Commission: "We meet four times a year, all those who help these people at the diocesan level. Each situation is different and Korean dioceses differ greatly: some focus more on the medical and health issues - for example for refugees from North Korea - while others are more committed to education and job placement. "

Immigrants have a hard time in Korea: the country is very closed from a social perspective, and the priority "is to make citizens understand that we are all human beings and children of God this is why we place great emphasis on the formation of those who operate on the field. Without education there is no basis, it is like building on sand. But every year we better results, and this is very encouraging. "

The most common ethnic groups in the country are Chinese, Filipino and Vietnamese: "All Asians, and this makes things easier and harder at the same time. But we must strive always and forever for the good of all". Fr. Mark Kim Pyeong-han, director of the Pastoral Commission for the work of the Archdiocese of Seoul agrees: "The majority of children of unregistered migrants do not enjoy state protection. But they have the right to receive them, otherwise we risk creating serious damage to them and to our society".

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