Skin ADV
07 February 2016
AsiaNews.it Twitter AsiaNews.it Facebook
Geographic areas




  • > Africa
  • > Central Asia
  • > Europe
  • > Middle East
  • > Nord America
  • > North Asia
  • > South Asia
  • > South East Asia
  • > South West Asia
  • > Sud America
  • > East Asia

  • mediazioni e arbitrati, risoluzione alternativa delle controversie e servizi di mediazione e arbitrato


    » 06/18/2013, 00.00

    CHINA

    China, the domestic market for ivory endangers the survival of elephants



    One-tenth of elephants on the planet killed last year. Despite the international ban on the ivory trade, the sale of "white gold" in China is lawful and widespread. A researcher: "The species is at risk, Beijing must recognize the problem."

    Beijing (AsiaNews / Agencies) - "The insatiable Chinese demand for ivory is likely to make the extinction of elephants a real problem". As researcher Jennifer Ngo writes in the South China, trafficking in elephant tusks, which is prohibited by the international community, is an easy trade through Hong Kong.

    There are about 400 thousand elephants in the world, divided between Central Africa and the Indian area. In the last year 40 thousand have been killed, explains the activist Joyce Poole "about 93% of these are victims of poachers." Although Beijing signed the international ban on trade in ivory in 1989, the sale of elephant tusks in the territory of China takes place in broad daylight. The so-called "white gold" makes a stop in Hong Kong, where, once avoided any international control, it can be sold in a transparent manner to Chinese buyers.

    According to data reported by Elephant Voices Group, a non-governmental organization of which  Joyce Poole is co-director, since 2008 Hong Kong has seen trade in some 16 tons of ivory, an amount that would have required the killing of at least 1800 living elephants. "It's not - says the activist - that the international ban does not work, but the reticence on the part of the Chinese authorities to apply it within their own borders and the increased trade is an incentive for the poachers."

    Ivory sells at 700 dollars per kg in China and is a prized symbol of high social status. Joyce Poole who will be engaged in a campaign to raise public awareness in Hong Kong, Shenzhen and Beijing, explains that "the ivory that is on the market today is the result of poaching, not a natural death. A lot of people cannot imagine that in order to get the tusks, the elephant has to be killed".

     

    e-mail this to a friend Printable version










    See also

    17/07/2008 CHINA - SOUTH AFRICA
    Animal rights activists on war footing against ivory market in China
    The organisation that deals with trade in endangered species has approved exchange between China and South Africa, allowing the Asian country to import 51 tonnes. In Kenya, three Chinese are arrested under the accusation of "illegal trafficking" of ivory.

    10/10/2012 LAOS - JAPAN
    Laotians and environmentalists against government loaning eight elephants to Japan
    The pachyderms are bound for zoos and a safari park under a three-year agreement between the two governments; one site is not far from the Fukushima evacuation zone. Once dubbed the 'Land of a million elephants', Laos now has only 900 animals. Illegal ivory trafficking is one major reason.

    30/06/2009 HONG KONG – CHINA
    Beijing concerns about 1 July march in Hong Kong
    At least 100,000 people are expected, including public sector employees frustrated by slow contract talks. A big turnout would be slap in the face of mainland China. Official ceremonies are scheduled in the morning, march for democracy in the afternoon.

    03/06/2006 china - hong kong
    The Tiananmen massacre: after 17 years let's build up workers' rights


    15/12/2005 HONG KONG – CHINA - WTO
    Chinese trade unionist: "WTO failed because it has no ethical or moral guidelines"

    Han Dongfang, founder of the first free Chinese trade union, told AsiaNews that the "WTO could play an important role in exporting values which protect workers". To save itself, China "must change its mentality and allow free unions".





    Editor's choices

    CHINA – VATICAN
    Global Times: the pope should accept the independence of the Chinese Church



    After 24 hours of silence, China’s media today published excerpts, comments and editorials about Pope Francis’ interview with Asia Times. Although the pope did not address religious issues or Church problems, many saw the interview as an attempt to improve diplomatic relations between China and the Vatican, and advised Francis to accept Mao Zedong’s "three principles of independence" (theology, administration, jurisdiction), which would leave the power to appoint bishops in the hands of the Party. The People's Daily’s Global Times publishes an editorial on the issue.


    INDIA – PHILIPPINES
    Archbishop of Guwahati: In Asia religion is not dying, the faithful take strength from the Eucharist



    Mgr Menamparampil is among the speakers at the International Eucharistic Congress in Cebu, Philippines. He was also a conflict mediator between various ethnic groups. He told AsiaNews about the value of the Congress for the Catholic Church in Asia and how people can bear witness the Gospel today, even amid tensions and violence of those who "hate us." "with the same pain in our hearts that we descend to our depths during a Eucharistic adoration."


    AsiaNews IS ALSO A MONTHLY!

    AsiaNews monthly magazine (in Italian) is free.
     

    SUBSCRIBE NOW

    News feed

    Canale RSScanale RSS 

    Add to Google









     

    Terra Santa Banner

    2003 © All rights reserved - AsiaNews C.F. e P.Iva: 00889190153 - GLACOM®