5 September, 2015 AsiaNews.it Twitter AsiaNews.it Facebook            

Help AsiaNews | About us | P.I.M.E. | | RssNewsletter | Mobile






mediazioni e arbitrati, risoluzione alternativa delle controversie e servizi di mediazione e arbitrato

e-mail this to a friend printable version


» 03/13/2012
IRAN
Death penalties rise as two men are publicly executed
In 2011, there were 65 hangings, 19 in 2020 and 9 in 2009. With today's executions, the number of public executions rises to 15 this year. The United Nations calls for a moratorium and legal guarantees for the accused. Iran slams the West for using human rights to strike at the Islamic Republic of Iran.

Teheran (AsiaNews/Agencies) - Two men were publicly hanged in Mashhad, north-eastern Iran (pictured), a day after a human rights report on Iran was released at the United Nations headquarters in Geneva that included a request for a moratorium on the death penalty.

According to official Iranian news agencies, the men were charged and convicted of involvement in 13 rape cases. They were arrested less than three months ago. The public hangings took place in Mashhad's Ferdowsi Square at 6:30 am, local time. The prisoners were identified as Akram Norouz Zahi, aka "Yasein", and Mojtaba Afshar, aka 'Saddam".

According to the Iran Human Rights annual report on the death penalty there was a dramatic increase in the number of public executions in 2011 in Iran. Sixty-five people were hanged publicly last year; that is more than three times the number in 2010 (19 public hangings) and seven times higher than in 2009 (nine public executions). This trend is continuing in 2012 where so far, at least 15 people have been hanged publicly.

Today's public executions took place just one day after the UN Special Rapporteur Ahmad Shaheed presented his report on the human rights situation in Iran at the UN Security Council meeting in Geneva.

The report criticises the dramatic increase in the number of executions, calling on the Iranian government "to seriously consider a moratorium on the death penalty for all crimes" and "allow for legal representation of accused persons at all stages of investigations."

Secretary of Iran's Human Rights Council Mohammad Javad Larijani lambasted Shaheed's report, saying it was biased.

Larijani insisted that Iran would never allow UN human rights mechanisms to become tools in the hands of US and some Western states to exert political pressure on the Islamic Republic of Iran.


e-mail this to a friend printable version

See also
12/19/2007 UNITED NATIONS
Partial victory against the death penalty
by Bernardo Cervellera
03/17/2015 IRAN
UN report describes a worsening human rights situation in Iran
01/31/2006 Saudi Arabia - Iran
UN to Saudi Arabia: An end to the execution of minors
01/15/2010 MONGOLIA
Mongolian president calls for the abolition of the death penalty
02/12/2009 CHINA - UNITED NATIONS
China rejects all criticism on human rights, but accepts advice from Cuba and Iran

Editor's choices
ASIA – EUROPEAN UNION
Aylan’s death and that of the Middle East
by Bernardo CervelleraThe death of a child from a sinking boat off the Turkish coast has moved the whole world, but lest we forget, thousands more have already died in Syria’s war. The refugee problem must be addressed but so must the causes that have led to this tragedy, namely Mideast wars, funding the Islamic State group, and proxies acting on behalf of regional and world powers.
VATICAN - IRAQ
Fr. Samir of Amadiya: The Pope is the voice of Iraqi refugees
by Bernardo CervelleraThe Chaldean priest met Pope Francis, asking him to keep the world’s focus on Christian refugees from Mosul and the Nineveh Plain. His diocese is home to 3500 Christian families and almost half a million Yazidis who fled Islamic State violence. ISIS is not all Islam and there are Muslims who want an Iraq of coexistence. Christians might not emigrate, but remain in their own land. Aid projects for refugees: school for children, work for adults, a home for every family. An appeal to AsiaNews.
LEBANON
Muslims defend Christians’ freedom in Beirut DeclarationFreedom of religion, education and opinion are defended by quoting the Qur’ān, which is the basis for the rule of law, not a religious state. Lebanese Sunnis slam violence committed in the name of God. The full declaration is reprinted here.

Dossier

Copyright © 2003 AsiaNews C.F. 00889190153 All rights reserved. Content on this site is made available for personal, non-commercial use only. You may not reproduce, republish, sell or otherwise distribute the content or any modified or altered versions of it without the express written permission of the editor. Photos on AsiaNews.it are largely taken from the internet and thus considered to be in the public domain. Anyone contrary to their publication need only contact the editorial office which will immediately proceed to remove the photos.