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  • » 06/08/2010, 00.00


    Dhaka: Facebook accessible again but press freedom still under threat

    William Gomes

    The government lifts ban on social network, which it blocked on 29 May, following the removal of Muhammad cartoons. Press freedom is in a critical state in the country. Police and secret services shut down national newspaper Daily Amar Desh, jailing editor, publisher and a few journalists.
    Dhaka (AsiaNews) – Facebook is again accessible in Bangladesh after “offensive” cartoons were removed. The famous online social network was blocked on 29 May after the publication of cartoons depicting the prophet Muhammad was deemed offensive to the religious sentiments of the Muslim majority of the population. In Bangladesh, Muslims represent 90 per cent of the population.

    In the meantime, media freedom remains in a critical state. On 1 June, the government shut down a national daily newspaper, the Daily Amar Desh.

    Heavily armed police and intelligence officials burst into the newspaper’s offices, sealed off its newsroom, and stopped the printing presses after they had began their run.

    The next day, the authorities arrested the newspaper’s acting editor Mahmudur Rahman with a few of his colleagues as well as its publisher, Hashmat Ali.

    Activists with the Asian Human Rights Commission (AHRC) said that the National Security Intelligence acted without an arrest warrant or a detention order.

    Mr Hashmat’s family told AsiaNews that in prison he had to sign blank sheets, later filled in by the secret services.

    Hashmat was forced to resign as Daily Amar Desh publisher and sign defamatory statements about the editor, Mahmudur Rahman.

    Bangladesh’s Information Minister Abul Kalam Azad told AsiaNews that the decision to close the newspaper did not come from the government but from the Office of the Deputy Commissioner of Dhaka

    For human rights activists, the government’s decision to wash its hands of the affair claiming non-involvement is laughable since this is not an isolated incident, but rather the latest in a series of negative episodes that have occurred over time. In fact, the government has already shut down two private broadcasters and a number of newspapers.

    AHRC called on the United Nations Human Rights Council to intervene.

    Accusing the government of jeopardising the democratic process, it demanded the immediate release of imprisoned journalists and the reopening of publications it closed down.

    It also called on the authorities to launch credible probes into the abuses that have occurred so far.

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    See also

    12/12/2007 SRI LANKA
    Violence as a “way of life” in Sri Lanka
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    18/09/2008 SRI LANKA
    More than a hundred thousand helpless refugees flee fighting between army and Tamil rebels
    The Asian Human Rights Commission releases a damning statement about helpless refugees. Army and rebels are told to respect communication lines and allow “neutral areas” where refugees can find shelter and help.

    20/03/2009 CHINA
    Former Chinese spy: secret service trying to clamp down on rights activists
    The Chinese secret service is "monitoring" dissidents, religious groups, and anyone who protests against injustice, and is repressing human rights. According to the former spy, it is important for Western governments to talk with Beijing not only about the economy, but also about human rights. It is the first instance of "treason" by a Chinese spy.

    18/01/2006 ASIA
    Human rights in Asia: serious problems in 10 countries

    The 2005 report of the Asian Human Rights Commission says human rights violations are on the rise. Governments take advantage of weak judicial powers and use the army for strong-arm tactics.

    02/09/2008 RUSSIA
    Magomed Yevloyev, critic of the Kremlin, killed by police
    His website attacked the president of Ingushetia, a close friend of Vladimir Putin. According to the police, his death was "accidental". Russia is one of the most dangerous places in the world for journalists.

    Editor's choices

    Syrian Trappist nuns say Western powers and factional media fuel war propaganda

    In a written appeal, the religious systematically take apart the version of the conflict touted by governments, NGOs and international news organizations. In Ghouta east, jihadists attack the capital and use civilians as human shields. The Syrian government and people have a duty to defend themselves from external attacks. The conflict alone has undermined the coexistence between Christians and Muslims in the country.

    Xinjiang, crosses, domes, statues destroyed: the new 'Sinicized' Cultural Revolution

    Bernardo Cervellera

    Crosses removed from the domes and the tympanum of Yining Church as well as external decorations and crosses, and the Way of the Cross within the church. The same happened at the churches of Manas and Hutubi. The Cross represents "a foreign religious infiltration ". Prayer services forbidden even in private houses under the threat of arrests and re-education. Children and young people forbidden to enter churches. Religious revival frightens the Party.


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