04/21/2011, 00.00
VATICAN
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Even today, Satan is testing Christians before the world, Pope says

Benedict XVI celebrates Mass for the ‘Lord’s Supper”. He prays for unity. Jesus “supports” Peter even today. We all need conversion. The Pope mentions the “empty places” in the Holy Land, receives offering for tsunami victims.
Rome (AsiaNews) – We “need to be converted [. . .]. We too, all of us, need to learn again to accept God and Jesus Christ as he is, and not the way we want him to be. We too find it hard to accept that he bound himself to the limitations of his Church and her ministers. [. . .] Today we are once more painfully aware that Satan has been permitted to sift the disciples before the whole world.” Pain and trust marked the start of Benedict XVI’S Easter Triduum, who this afternoon concelebrated in Rome’s Basilica of St John Lateran the Mass for the Lord’s Supper.

Speaking about the Last Supper in his homily, in which he also referred to empty places in the Holy Land, the Pope said stressed three elements, namely the necessary relationship between faith and love, prayers for Christian unity and, in this context, remarks addressed to Peter, “Simon, Simon, behold, Satan demanded to have you, that he might sift you like wheat, but I have prayed for you, that your faith may not fail; and when you have turned again, strengthen your brethren (Lk 22:31).”

Hence, even if “Satan has been permitted to sift the disciples before the whole world, [. . .] we know that Jesus prays for the faith of Peter and his successors. We know that Peter, who walks towards the Lord upon the stormy waters of history and is in danger of sinking, is sustained ever anew by the Lord’s hand and guided over the waves. But Jesus continues with a prediction and a mandate. ‘When you have turned again . . . .’ Every human being, save Mary, has constant need of conversion. Jesus tells Peter beforehand of his coming betrayal and conversion. But what did Peter need to be converted from? When first called, terrified by the Lord’s divine power and his own weakness, Peter had said: ‘Go away from me, Lord, for I am a sinful man!’ (Lk 5:8).”

“In the light of the Lord, he recognizes his own inadequacy. Precisely in this way, in the humility of one who knows that he is a sinner, is he called. He must discover this humility ever anew. At Caesarea Philippi Peter could not accept that Jesus would have to suffer and be crucified: it did not fit his image of God and the Messiah. In the Upper Room, he did not want Jesus to wash his feet: it did not fit his image of the dignity of the Master. In the Garden of Olives, he wielded his sword. He wanted to show his courage. Yet before the servant girl, he declared that he did not know Jesus. At the time, he considered it a little lie, which would let him stay close to Jesus. All his heroism collapsed in a shabby bid to be at the centre of things. We too, all of us, need to learn again to accept God and Jesus Christ as he is, and not the way we want him to be. We too find it hard to accept that he bound himself to the limitations of his Church and her ministers. We too do not want to accept that he is powerless in this world. We too find excuses when being his disciples starts becoming too costly, too dangerous. All of us need the conversion, which enables us to accept Jesus in his reality as God and man. We need the humility of the disciple who follows the will of his Master. Tonight we want to ask Jesus to look to us, as with kindly eyes he looked to Peter when the time was right, and to convert us.”

“After Peter was converted, he was called to strengthen his brethren. It is not irrelevant that this task was entrusted to him in the Upper Room. The ministry of unity has its visible place in the celebration of the Holy Eucharist. Dear friends, it is a great consolation for the Pope to know that at each Eucharistic celebration everyone prays for him, and that our prayer is joined to the Lord ’s Prayer for Peter. Only by the prayer of the Lord and of the Church can the Pope fulfil his task of strengthening his brethren – of feeding the flock of Christ and of becoming the guarantor of that unity which becomes a visible witness to the mission, which Jesus received from the Father.”

The second element Benedict XVI stressed is the notion that “faith requires love”. Jesus went to the cenacle, the place where he “eagerly desired” to celebrate “his final meal and the institution of the Holy Eucharist. In this eager desire of Jesus, we can recognize the desire of God himself—his expectant love for mankind, for his creation. A love which awaits the moment of union, a love which wants to draw mankind to itself and thereby fulfil the desire of all creation, for creation eagerly awaits the revelation of the children of God (cf. Rom 8:19).”

“Jesus desires us, he awaits us. But what about ourselves? Do we really desire him? Are we anxious to meet him? Do we desire to encounter him, to become one with him, to receive the gifts he offers us in the Holy Eucharist? Or are we indifferent, distracted, busy about other things? From Jesus’ banquet parables we realize that he knows all about empty places at table, invitations refused, lack of interest in him and his closeness. For us, the empty places at the table of the Lord’s wedding feast, whether excusable or not, are no longer a parable but a reality, in those very countries to which he had revealed his closeness in a special way. Jesus also knew about guests who come to the banquet without being robed in the wedding garment—they come not to rejoice in his presence but merely out of habit, since their hearts are elsewhere.”

“In one of his homilies Saint Gregory the Great asks: Who are these people who enter without the wedding garment? What is this garment and how does one acquire it? He replies that those who are invited and enter do in some way have faith. It is faith, which opens the door to them. But they lack the wedding garment of love. Those who do not live their faith as love are not ready for the banquet and are cast out. Eucharistic communion requires faith, but faith requires love; otherwise, even as faith, it is dead.”

Finally, as John tells us, Jesus prayed four times for Christian unity during the Last Supper. “Jesus explicitly states that this prayer is not meant simply for the disciples then present, but for all who would believe in him (cf. Jn 17:20). He prays that all may be one ‘as you, Father, are in me and I am in you, so that the world may believe’ (Jn 17:21). Christian unity can exist only if Christians are deeply united to him, to Jesus. Faith and love for Jesus, faith in his being one with the Father and openness to becoming one with him, are essential. Christian unity can exist only if Christians are deeply united to him, to Jesus. Faith and love for Jesus, faith in his being one with the Father and openness to becoming one with him, are essential. This unity, then, is not something purely interior or mystical. It must become visible, so visible as to prove before the world that Jesus was sent by the Father.

Following tradition, the Pope washed the feet of 12 priests from the Diocese of Rome during the service. When gifts were presented, the Pope also received an offering for the victims of the earthquake and tsunami in Japan.

At the end of the ceremony, the Holy sacrament was replaced in the Chapel of Repose.

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