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  • » 08/21/2012, 00.00

    INDIA - PAKISTAN

    Muslim threats, nationalist fantasies and the 'Great Assam Exodus'

    Nirmala Carvalho

    Almost 300,000 people from north-eastern India flee Karnataka and Maharashtra. New Delhi blames Islamabad for circulating revenge text messages following sectarian violence between tribal Bodos and Muslims settlers in Assam. For activist Raghuvanshi, the problem is rooted in tensions generated by Hindu nationalist forces.

    Mumbai (AsiaNews) - New Delhi and Islamabad could be facing another diplomatic crisis as a result of a recent major population displacement within India. Hundreds of thousands of people from Assam have in fact fled Bangalore (Karnataka), Mumbai and Pune (Maharashtra) after they received death threats via the Internet. The messages, which were posted mostly on Facebook and Twitter, warned workers from north-eastern India that Indian Muslims would take revenge against them for sectarian clashes last month in the state of Assam. For India, Pakistan is behind this hate campaign, but Islamabad has denied any involvement, calling on New Delhi to back up its claims with evidence.

    In Assam, violence between tribal Bodos and Muslim settlers left 80 people dead in July. This has sparked the panicked flight of about 400,000 people from both communities, some finding shelter in refugee camps set up by the local Catholic Church. Tensions eventually spread to other Indian states where Bodos and other ethnic groups moved in search of work.

    Last week, panic began spreading when text messages and photos on social networks began fuelling rumours. About 300,000 people from north-eastern India, mostly students, crammed railway stations trying to escape, fearful they might be targeted by Muslims for retaliation.

    At present, the exodus has stopped and things are getting back to normal thanks to cooperation among the various Indian states involved. However, it is unclear who posted the first intimidating messages online. For New Delhi, the culprits are in Pakistan. Islamabad has denied the accusations, calling on India to show its evidence, which has not been forthcoming.

    "Violence in Assam is localised with its particular history and context," human rights activist Lenin Raghuvanshi told AsiaNews.

    However, for Raghuvanshi, who is director of the People's Vigilance Committee on Human Rights (PVCHR), such conflicts "have repercussions that explode in internal conflicts fuelled by the nationalism of fascist forces."

    In his view, "India's greatest threat is an internal exodus provoked by internal nationalist groups (supporters of the Hindutva ideology) or external groups like Muslim fundamentalists."

     

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    See also

    24/08/2012 INDIA
    Hindu nationalists, not Pakistan, behind Assam hate text messages
    At least 20 per cent of the web pages blocked by the Indian government came from radical Hindutva groups. Pictures and videos showed doctored self-immolations from Tibet with inflammatory captions. Ultranationalist Hindus tried this way to increase their influence among Tribals in northeast India.

    21/11/2012 INDIA
    Caritas India trains tribal and Muslim community leaders to promote peace in Assam
    The goal is to re-establish harmony between the two communities, divided by communal violence in July. Unrest left 88 people dead, 400,000 people displaced. In addition to training, Caritas provided 6,000 kg of rice and mosquito nets to 2,000 families living in refugee camps set up by the Diocese of Bongaigaon.

    14/12/2012 INDIA
    Christmas tea to reconcile tribal Bodo and Assam's Muslims
    A diocesan NGO in Bongaigaon is behind the initiative. In July residents were hit by floods and sectarian violence. Church and Caritas are working together to bring peace to the two communities.

    24/11/2011 PAKISTAN
    Islamabad, victory for Paul Bhatti and APMA: Jesus Christ is no longer banned in texting
    The commitment of the Special Adviser and Catholics led to the cancellation of the name from the list of prohibited terms in text messages. Bhatti decisive collaboration between the government and authority for telecommunications. AsiaNews disproves claims by some media, which confer the victory to under-Secretary Akram Gill.

    22/01/2008 PHILIPPINES
    Church launches the Gospel via text messages
    The project is the brainchild of the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) Commission on Biblical Apostolate, and involves the sending of texts and animation via mms to the mobile phones of subscribers. The Commission secretary underlines the initiatives’ importance in attracting young people by speaking their same language.



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