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  • mediazioni e arbitrati, risoluzione alternativa delle controversie e servizi di mediazione e arbitrato


    » 10/07/2009, 00.00

    CHINA

    Populous China with infertility problems, made worse by abortion and one-child policy



    Semi-official data indicate that 40 million couples, one in eight, have difficulties in having children. Fertility treatment often fails. For experts, this is the outcome of the ‘one-child’ policy, too many abortions and obesity.
    Beijing (AsiaNews/Agencies) – At least 40 million couples in mainland China have difficulties in having children or are actually infertile. This puts the infertility rate at 12.5 per cent for all couples in childbearing age. As a result of China’s “one-child policy”, the most populous country in the world could soon experience labour shortages and a rapidly aging population.

    The 2009 Investigative Report on the Current State of Infertility in China, which was released at the China International Summit Forum on Infertility in August, found a significant decline in the average sperm count of men on the mainland, from about 100 million sperm per millilitre of semen 40 years ago to about 20 million to 40 million in recent years.

    A survey of 18,000 people seeking treatment for infertility in Beijing found that 10 per cent had been trying to conceive for a year since getting married, 15 per cent had been trying for two years and 25 per cent for 10 years, the report said.

    For women, the leading cause of infertility is the blockage of the fallopian tubes, mostly induced by abortions. In all, 66 per cent said their infertility had not been cured after repeated treatments.

    The figure is alarming also because the problem is affecting the 25 to 30 age group seeking reproductive help.

    Since the late 1970s, China has pursued a one-child policy, whereby couples are prevented from having a second child, except for rural couples when their first-born is female or members of ethnic minorities, and punished with heavy fines in case of violations.

    Now medical experts conclude that abortion can cause complications for women who want to have children.

    The best fertility clinics in China, like the Reproductive and Genetic Hospital of Citic-Xiangya in Changsha, see long queues of desperate couples, some coming from afar.

    The situation is such that the hospital's president, Prof Lu Guangxiu, said it had implemented a waiting list system of up to a year to cope with demand. He said that the high number of abortions and increasing levels of obesity were the main reasons for rising infertility rates.

    He also noted that pre-marital sex is widespread but information about contraceptive methods remains limited, so that many women resort to abortion to get rid of unwanted pregnancies.

    Wang Tianping, vice-president of the Population Association of China, a non-governmental organisation set up by academics in 1981, warned that the problem of infertility has been underestimated. He warns that China might face labour shortages and a large pool of elderly who will have to be maintained by a generation of single children. Reproductive difficulties might make matters in unexpected ways.

    Couples can still resort to in-vitro fertilisation, but the procedure can cost between 15,000 yuan and 25,000 yuan, a price that is well beyond the reach of many couples.

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    See also

    15/09/2004 PHILIPPINES
    No to contraceptives for birth control, says Archbishop Cruz


    29/04/2005 PHILIPPINES
    Family Planning Bill in Philippines Paving Way for Legalized Abortion


    31/07/2009 CHINA
    Some 13 million abortions performed outside of China’s one-child policy
    The overall number comes from hospital data, but it is likely higher because it does not take into account private clinics. Young unmarried women turn to abortion as a means of contraception. In the meantime a public debate is underway in the country about possible changes to the policy. A book with analyses by Chinese rights advocate Harry Wu on the negative impact of the one-child policy is published in Italy.

    28/01/2015 CHINA
    Shanghai government calls for more children or the city will collapse
    By the end of the year, a third of all residents will be 60 and over. Forgetting 35 years of the country's violent one-child policy, an official with the Family Development Bureau blames women who choose a career over family for the problem. The existing hukou system of family registration, which penalises migrant workers, comes in for criticism.

    28/04/2011 CHINA
    New census: unfettered urbanisation in an aging China
    Figures from the 2010 Census show fewer people under 14 and more over 60. Migrant workers number 220 million. Despite growing criticism, the Communist party reiterates support for the one-child policy.



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