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» 10/05/2004 15:25
TURKEY - EUROPE
Turkey's forty year march towards Europe (An Overview)

Ankara (AsiaNews) – The European Commission's report on Turkey's progress toward European Union (EU) membership will be unveiled in Brussels tomorrow. If the report's recommendations are favourable, the next step in Turkey's eventual entry will be the upcoming European Council, to be held on December 17. The Council's 25 member states will decide whether to begin talks with Ankara on its EU accession.

The first official ties between Europe and Turkey date back to 1964. Forty years ago the old European Economic Community (EEC) and the Turkish government signed an 'Association Agreement' creating a commercial union between the two parties. Implementation was expected to be done in three stages and take 13 years.

A new protocol was signed in 1970 establishing a new timetable of measures in which both parties offered each other concessions in the areas of industrial goods (to be realised by 1982) and agricultural products (1992). However, the economic difficulties Turkey faced in the 1970s prevented the accord from being implemented.

Negotiations between the two sides restarted in 1980 but came to halt in September of that year when the Turkish military staged a coup. In 1986 they started again but this time under the shadow cast by a rising anti-European Islamic party. In 1987, Turkey applied for full EU membership. Brussels's first answer came in 1989 and was evasive, but since it was not an outright refusal then Turkish president Ozal saw it as a positive step.

In 1999 Turkey was officially accepted as a candidate for EU membership. But the turning point came in 2002 when Recep Tayyip Erdogan, leader of the Moderate Islamic 'Justice and Development Party' (Adalet ve Kalkinma Partisi or AKP) ran and won the elections on a platform of reforms and modernisation. One of his key policy objectives was Turkey's entry into Europe by 2012. According to Turkish Finance Minister Kemal Unakitan, his country can meet the Maastricht criteria within five years.

Turkey has 70 million inhabitants, 99 per cent Muslim. Christians represent 0.6 per cent of the population with some 30,000 Catholics.

This year the economy is expected to grow by 7.9 per cent with inflation running at 25.3 per cent. Unemployment stands at 10.5 per cent (2003 data).


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See also
12/17/2004 TURKEY - EUROPEAN UNION
EU's Cyprus demand dismays Turkey
10/05/2004 TURKEY - EUROPE
A ticket to Europe for Turkey? Yes, but …
by Marek Zuboir
10/06/2004 TURKEY - EUROPE
What changes in store for Turkey and the EU
09/08/2004 TURKEY - EUROPEAN UNION
EU Commissioner says Turkey's entry will end European integration
12/16/2004 Turkey – EUROPEAN UNION
Brussels to decide Turkish bid to join EU

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SYRIA
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FRANCE - IRAQ
Chaldean Patriarch on the uncertain future of eastern Christians, a bridge between the West and Islam
by Mar Louis Raphael I SakoThe wars in Iraq, Libya and Afghanistan have made things worse for their peoples, especially minorities. As Western policies have been a failure, fundamentalism has grown with the Arab Spring losing out to extremism. Muslim authorities have a role in protecting rights and religious freedom. The presence of Christians in the Middle East is crucial for Muslims.
CHINA - EUROPEAN UNION
Xi Jinping returns home full of deals and silence
by Bernardo CervelleraThe Chinese president signed agreements worth tens of billions of Euros in France, Germany, the Netherlands, and Belgium. He also stayed clear of any press conference. At the College of Europe in Bruges, he presented his dream of a new trillion-dollar Silk Road. Yet, he also made it clear that at home, the monopoly of power stays with the Party, squashing any dream for political reform in China. On the Internet, netizens disagree with him.

Dossier
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