02/17/2016, 22.10
MEXICO – VATICAN
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Pope in Mexico: prisoner reintegration is done by eliminating what makes society sick

Francis visited prison inmates in Ciudad Juárez. “The problem of security is not resolved only by incarcerating; rather, it calls us to intervene by confronting the structural and cultural causes of insecurity that impact the entire social framework. [. . .] Social reintegration begins by making sure that all of our children go to school and that their families obtain dignified work by creating public spaces for leisure and recreation, and by fostering civic participation, health services and access to basic services, to name just a few possible measures.”

Ciudad Juárez  (AsiaNews) – Pope Francis this morning at 10.30 am spoke to about 700 inmates in the courtyard of the Centro de Readaptación Social estatal n. 3 "(CERESO n. 3) in Ciudad Juarez, State of Chihuahua. He also personally greeted some 50 of them, as well as a group of the relatives (pictured).

Here the pope spoke about “Reintegration or rehabilitation,” which begin with “social health,” i.e. developing ways to avoid “sickness, polluting relationships in neighbourhoods, schools, town squares, the streets, homes and in the whole of the social spectrum,” and continues with the promotion of “a culture which acts and seeks to prevent those situations and pathways that end in damaging and impairing the social fabric.”

This, the last leg of the pope’s visit to Mexico, is emblematic. The city the pontiff chose is a place that symbolises drug trafficking, femicide and sexual exploitation, the last bridge for Latin American migrants trying to cross illegally into the United States. It will also be here that he will celebrate his last Mass on Mexican soil, at 4 pm, about 80 metres from the heavily guarded US border, with worshippers on both sides, a facility that underwent major renovation as part of the state’s penal system reform, earning international recognition.

The Holy Father greeted the inmates saying, “I could not leave without greeting you and celebrating with you the Jubilee of Mercy.

“Celebrating the Jubilee of Mercy with you is recalling the pressing journey that we must undertake in order to break the cycle of violence and crime. We have already lost many decades thinking and believing that everything will be resolved by isolating, separating, incarcerating, and ridding ourselves of problems, believing that these policies really solve problems. We have forgotten to focus on what must truly be our concern: people’s lives; their lives, those of their families, and those who have suffered because of this cycle of violence.

“Divine Mercy reminds us that prisons are an indication of the kind of society we are. In many cases they are a sign of the silence and omissions which have led to a throwaway culture, a symptom of a culture that has stopped supporting life, of a society that has abandoned its children.

“Mercy reminds us that reintegration does not begin here within these walls; rather it begins before, it begins ‘outside’, in the streets of the city. Reintegration or rehabilitation begins by creating a system which we could call social health, that is, a society which seeks not to cause sickness, polluting relationships in neighbourhoods, schools, town squares, the streets, homes and in the whole of the social spectrum. A system of social health that endeavours to promote a culture which acts and seeks to prevent those situations and pathways that end in damaging and impairing the social fabric.

“At times it may seem that prisons are intended more to prevent people from committing crimes than to promote the process of rehabilitation that allows us to address the social, psychological and family problems which lead a person to act in a certain way. The problem of security is not resolved only by incarcerating; rather, it calls us to intervene by confronting the structural and cultural causes of insecurity that impact the entire social framework.

“Jesus’ concern for the care of the hungry, the thirsty, the homeless and prisoners (cf. Mt 25:34-40) sought to express the core of the Father’s mercy. This becomes a moral imperative for the whole of society that wishes to maintain the necessary conditions for a better common life. It is within a society’s capacity to include the poor, infirm and imprisoned, that we see its ability to heal their wounds and make them builders of a peaceful coexistence. Social reintegration begins by making sure that all of our children go to school and that their families obtain dignified work by creating public spaces for leisure and recreation, and by fostering civic participation, health services and access to basic services, to name just a few possible measures.

“Celebrating the Jubilee of Mercy with you means learning not to be prisoners of the past, of yesterday. It means learning to open the door to the future, to tomorrow; it means believing that things can change. Celebrating the Jubilee of Mercy with you means inviting you to lift up your heads and to work in order to gain this space of longed-for freedom.

“We know that we cannot turn back, we know that what is done, is done. This is the way I wanted to celebrate with you the Jubilee of Mercy, because it does not exclude the possibility of writing a new story and moving forward. You suffer the pain of a failure, you feel the remorse of your actions and in many cases, with great limitations, you seek to remake your lives in the midst of solitude. You have known the power of sorrow and sin, and have not forgotten that within your reach is the power of the resurrection, the power of divine mercy which makes all things new.

“Now, this mercy can reach you in the hardest and most difficult of places, but such occasions can also perhaps bring truly positive results. From inside this prison, you must work hard to change the situations which create the most exclusion. Speak with your loved ones, tell them of your experiences, help them to put an end to this cycle of violence and exclusion. The one who has suffered the greatest pain, and we could say “has experienced hell”, can become a prophet in society. Work so that this society which uses people and discards them will not go on claiming victims.”

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