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    » 08/29/2007, 00.00

    SOUTH KOREA – AFGHANISTAN

    Korean bishop expresses joy for hostages, sense of humiliation for Taliban deal

    Joseph Yun Li-sun

    Mgr Lazarus You Heung-sik, bishop of Taejŏn and chairman of Caritas Corea, talks to AsiaNews about the “dangerous precedent” set by the South Korean authorities in dealing directly with Islamic fundamentalists. People in South Korea feel joy that human lives were spared, but also humiliation about Protestant Churches, which have come under intense criticism in South Korean society.

    Seoul (AsiaNews) – The agreement sealed by the South Korean government and the Talibans for the release of Christian hostages is “a source of joy because human life must always come first. But at the same time it should not set an example for the rest of the world,” said Mgr Lazarus You Heung-sik, bishop of Taejŏn and chairman of Caritas Corea, when he heard about the release of the first South Korean Christian hostages abducted in Afghanistan on July 19.

    The prelate told AsiaNews that “the release of Protestant missionaries has set a dangerous precedent. Our government humiliated itself by dealing with fundamentalists. Now they can think they can do the same with other hostages. At the same time, the agreement humiliated Protestant Churches who have been much criticised at home for their action abroad and for the ransom many think they paid.”

    This is because “Korean Protestants are sometime themselves fundamentalist and aggressive in their faith. They talk about social service but in reality seek conversions, often forcefully. This is no true evangelical spirit; it is not true mission. Now many have come to realise this here (in South Korea) as well.”

    South Korean Protestant organisations welcomed the agreement between the government and the Talibans with joy. They have pledged not to undertake any missionary activities in Afghanistan as agreed to in the release deal.

    Christian Council of Korea Chairman Lee Yong-kyu thanked the government for its efforts on behalf of the hostages and expressed sympathy for the families of the captives.

    The Korea National Council of Churches in a statement Tuesday night said it was “right to respect the government’s agreement with the Taliban,” adding that it will use the hostage crisis as a opportunity to reflect on Korean Churches’ overseas missionary strategies and to devise more effective and safer ways to carry out missionary activities abroad.

    But for Choi Han-woo, head of the Institute of Asian Culture and Development and organiser of an abortive “peace rally” of Korean Christians in Afghanistan last year, the Talibans “apparently demanded the ban to officially define Korean volunteer activities as missionary work and to justify their abduction.” Still he said that his organisation will pull out its “aid workers” from Afghanistan by late this month in compliance with the agreement.

    Although two Christian missionaries were killed, the families of Korean hostages expressed joy and happiness for the successful end to the incident.

    Ryu Haeng-sik, whose wife was among the hostages, said: “I could not tell my child that his mother was kidnapped,” but now “I am truly grateful to tell him that his mother will return.”

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    See also

    03/08/2006 AFGHANISTAN – SOUTH KOREA
    Kabul to expel Korean evangelicals
    The first group has already been sent home. Organisers express their disappointment because they say local authorities and residents were really cooperating.

    14/08/2007 AFGHANISTAN – SOUTH KOREA
    Two women freed by Talibans soon home
    South Korean Embassy in Kabul announces early flight home. Negotiations over the other 19 hostages still held by the Talibans, 14 of whom are women, continue. Seoul and Washington call for their “immediate and unconditional” release. Ghazni governor makes an appeal.

    16/06/2006 SOUTH KOREA
    Christian groups claim right to manage their own schools
    Under the new law, which comes into effect on July 1, one quarter of boards of directors must be named by outside groups.

    31/08/2007 SOUTH KOREA – AFGHANISTAN
    Final hostages freed, Korea evaluates the cost of the kidnapping
    The remaining 7 hostages, kidnapped in Afghanistan in July, where freed yesterday evening. The government asks families to contribute to the payment of the ransom, while the general public attacks the Presbyterian Church responsible for having organised the mission.

    16/08/2007 NORTH KOREA – SOUTH KOREA
    Caritas Corea to help northern flood victims
    Mgr Lazarus You Heung-sik, president of the Catholic humanitarian agency, makes the announcement. He says that his organisation is waiting for an assessment before intervening. Red Cross reports more than 220 dead and 300,000 homeless people. Mountain deforestation is the main cause for the disaster.



    Editor's choices

    CHINA - VATICAN
    Vatican silence over Shanghai’s Mgr Ma Daqin causing confusion and controversy

    Bernardo Cervellera

    For some, Mgr Ma’s blog post praising the Patriotic Association and acknowledging his mistakes is nothing but “dirt”. For others, he chose humiliation for the “sake of his diocese”. Many wonder why the Holy See has remained silent about the article’s content and the bishop’s persecution. Some suspect the Vatican views the episode in positive terms. Yet, the Ma Daqin affair raises a major question. Has Benedict XVI’s Letter to Chinese Catholics (which describes the Patriotic Association as “incompatible with Catholic doctrine”) been abolished? If it has, who did it? A journey of compromises without truth is full of risks.


    CHINA – VATICAN
    Mgr Ma Daqin: the text of his “confession”

    Mons. Taddeo Ma Daqin

    Four years after quitting the Chinese Patriotic Catholic Association, the bishop of Shanghai “admits” his faults on his blog, praising the organisation that controls the Church. We publish his article, almost in its entirety. Translation by AsiaNews.


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