16 April, 2014 AsiaNews.it Twitter AsiaNews.it Facebook            

Help AsiaNews | About us | P.I.M.E. | | RssNewsletter





mediazioni e arbitrati, risoluzione alternativa delle controversie e servizi di mediazione e arbitrato
e-mail this to a friend printable version


» 06/12/2013 13:51
INDIA
As a result of forced sterilisations, 4.6 million women can no longer have children in India
The figure is from 2012. In order to keep in check the birth rate, forced tubal ligament is a top "contraceptive" method used in the country. Poor illiterate women are the most affected. In exchange for US$ 10, many accept to undergo the operation without knowing that they will become sterile. Yet, children continue to be born at a rate of about 18 million each year.

New Delhi (AsiaNews/Agencies) - A dozen tables next to each other, sheets stained with blood, doctors and nurses without coats, sometimes without protective masks, and tools only rinsed with hot water are the conditions in which 4.6 million women underwent sterilisation against their will in India last year in accordance with the government's birth control policies.

As part of such policies, vasectomies represent 4 per cent of all sterilisation operations performed. Instead, most forced sterilisations involve women in the poorest states in India. Bihar, which has the lowest annual per-capita income in the country and the highest illiteracy rate, leads the pack.

Often women are tricked into accepting tubal ligation. Recruited for birth control campaigns, actors go from village to village, offering women US$ 10, or about a week's salary for a poor family, in order to undergo this operation. In principle, it is a free choice but in practice the women are not told that they can no longer have children. Many agree only because of the extreme poverty in which they live.

"I did it out of desperation," said Devi, 25, as she lay on the concrete floor recuperating at the clinic in the state of Bihar. "We're so poor, we need the money. Health officials came to our home. They told us it would be best."

In Bihar, the authorities plan to sterilise 650,000 women and 12,000 men annually, according to the state health ministry. This year the state is planning more than 12,000 female sterilisation camps.

Women are the focus of the sterilisation drive because India has a patriarchal, male-dominated culture, said Sona Sharma, co-director of the Population Foundation of India, an advocacy group.

"Men fear they will lose their virility or they will become weak if they undergo the operation," Sharma said. "As the breadwinners they make the decisions."

According to United Nations data, 49 per cent of all couples in India practice birth control. Of that group, about three-quarters do so by having the wife sterilised.

India was the first country in the world to introduce a policy designed to reduce population, beginning in 1952 as hunger mounted in the years following independence.

When it comes to female sterilisations, India leads the world with 37 per cent, more than China (34 per cent).

Paradoxically, large-scale sterilisation campaigns have not had the desired effects. Even though the population grew by 17.6 per cent in the last decade, 4 per cent less than in the previous decade, on average 18 million more children are born each year. One in five babies born in the world starts life in India.


e-mail this to a friend printable version

See also
06/01/2011 CHINA
Forced abortions in China: you (and the UN) are funding them
by Reggie Littlejohn*
10/27/2004 PHILIPPINES
Filipino economic lobbies press for population controls
02/10/2011 CHINA
Chen Guangcheng, practically still in prison
02/22/2005 PHILIPPINES
Fines and prison terms for not practicing contraception
01/30/2014 SINGAPORE
In the Year of the Horse, Singapore's PM calls for more marriages and children

Editor's choices
SYRIA
I will miss you Fr Frans, you inspired us all, says Syrian Jesuit
by Tony Homsy*A young priest from the Society of Jesus remembers the life and work of Fr Frans van der Lugt, who was killed in Homs after he refused to abandon residents beleaguered by hunger and war. "He gave and continues to give everything for the Church, Syria, and peace. His story and qualities made him an exceptional missionary and witness to the Gospel." Reprinted courtesy of 'The Jesuit Post'.
FRANCE - IRAQ
Chaldean Patriarch on the uncertain future of eastern Christians, a bridge between the West and Islam
by Mar Louis Raphael I SakoThe wars in Iraq, Libya and Afghanistan have made things worse for their peoples, especially minorities. As Western policies have been a failure, fundamentalism has grown with the Arab Spring losing out to extremism. Muslim authorities have a role in protecting rights and religious freedom. The presence of Christians in the Middle East is crucial for Muslims.
CHINA - EUROPEAN UNION
Xi Jinping returns home full of deals and silence
by Bernardo CervelleraThe Chinese president signed agreements worth tens of billions of Euros in France, Germany, the Netherlands, and Belgium. He also stayed clear of any press conference. At the College of Europe in Bruges, he presented his dream of a new trillion-dollar Silk Road. Yet, he also made it clear that at home, the monopoly of power stays with the Party, squashing any dream for political reform in China. On the Internet, netizens disagree with him.

Dossier
by Giulio Aleni / (a cura di) Gianni Criveller
pp. 176
by Lazzarotto Angelo S.
pp. 528
by Bernardo Cervellera
pp. 240
Copyright © 2003 AsiaNews C.F. 00889190153 All rights reserved. Content on this site is made available for personal, non-commercial use only. You may not reproduce, republish, sell or otherwise distribute the content or any modified or altered versions of it without the express written permission of the editor. Photos on AsiaNews.it are largely taken from the internet and thus considered to be in the public domain. Anyone contrary to their publication need only contact the editorial office which will immediately proceed to remove the photos.