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  • mediazioni e arbitrati, risoluzione alternativa delle controversie e servizi di mediazione e arbitrato


    » 03/16/2010, 00.00

    CHINA – JAPAN

    Beijing, Tokyo drop US Treasury bills as China faces inflation and bad debt

    Wang Zhicheng

    China cuts its US assets by US$ 5.8 billion; Japan drops US$ 300 million. Wen Jiabao wants the US to give assurances over China’s dollar holdings; Washington wants Beijing to stop manipulating the yuan exchange rate, which is penalising the rest of the world economy. A majority (51 per cent) of Chinese fear inflation will rise. Bad debt is growing as the government’s aid package ends.
    Beijing (AsiaNews) – Beijing and Tokyo cut their holdings in US securities, concerned the US economy might collapse. In the meantime, people in China are jittery over inflation and bad loans to banks and state-owned corporations.

    China remained the biggest foreign owner of US Treasuries, even as its holdings dropped by a net US$ 5.8 billion to US $ 889 billion, this according to Treasury Department data released yesterday in Washington. Japan cut its holdings in January by US$ 300 million to US$ 765.4 billion.

    China has sought assurances from the United States over the safety of US government debt, especially at a time when the US budget deficit has increased to unprecedented levels, raising the spectre of runaway inflation. Because of this, Chinese officials have questioned the dollar’s role as a reserve currency.

    Last week, Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao sought assurances that the US would protect the value of China’s dollar assets. At a press conference in Beijing marking the end of China’s annual parliamentary meetings, Wen said dollar volatility is a “big” concern and that he was “still worried” about China’s US currency assets.

    Complicating matter is the fact that the low exchange of the yuan has made Chinese exports unbeatable, according to some analysts, in a world still reeling from a global crisis that cannot absorb all of them.

    Indeed, about 130 US lawmakers called on US President Barack Obama to get tough with mainland over its currency practices. “The impact of China's currency manipulation on the US economy cannot be overstated. Maintaining its currency at a devalued exchange rate provides a subsidy to Chinese companies and unfairly disadvantages foreign competitors,” the legislators said in a letter.

    Economist Maurizio d’Orlando told AsiaNews that the low level of the yuan is “something abnormal, excessive and beyond any conceivable limit.” Currently, the yuan is pegged against the US dollar at 6.833. However, based on purchasing power the yuan should appreciate by 33.43 per cent and be exchanged at around 5.121 against the US dollar (see Maurizio d’Orlando, “G8, toxic securities, US and Chinese addictions,” in AsiaNews, 7 July 2009). For d’Orlando, “China’s strategy is hegemonic; its purpose is one of national grandeur in the Far East.” But, “It is being achieved by destroying the manufacturing capacity of the rest of the world, enslaving entire domestic groups of people.”

    By contrast, Yao Jian, spokesman for China’s Commerce Ministry, said, “If the exchange rate issue is politicised, then in coping with the global financial crisis this will be of no help in co-ordination between the parties involved”.

    Nobel Prize-winning US economist Paul Krugman countered saying that “China's policy of keeping its currency, the renminbi, undervalued has become a significant drag on global economic recovery. Something must be done.”

    Right now, inflation and possible financial bubbles are Beijing’s greatest concern. In the latest quarterly survey published in the China Securities Journal, 51 per cent of those questioned said they were dissatisfied with the current rate of inflation of 2.5 per cent. They said that they also expected inflation to continue rising next quarter. Consumer prices actually rose 2.7 per cent in the year to February, up from a 1.5 per cent pace in January.

    Inflation appears to be the logical consequence of the government’s approach to the world crisis. In 2008, the authorities pumped 4 trillion yuan into the economy through loans to banks and companies, reaching 9.59 trillion last year (US$ 1.4 trillion). Experts note that much of the aid money was used to fuel real estate speculation and prop up bankrupt state-owned banks and companies.

    Now, many fear that if the government stops giving out loans, China’s banks might collapse under the weight of bad debt; defaulting on their own loans and having customers default on theirs.

    In a “worst-case scenario,” non-performing loans of local-government investment vehicles could climb to 2.4 trillion yuan (US$ 350 billion) by 2011, said Sjen Minggao, Citigroup’s Hong Kong-based chief economist for greater China.

    If this should happen, the government would have to devise a massive financial bailout for the financial sector.

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    See also

    28/01/2013 MYANMAR
    World Bank announces debt reduction, new loans to restart Myanmar's economy
    The bank inks a new deal to provide fresh loans to the former Burma. As the Japan Bank for International Cooperation pledges a bridge loan, Japan lines up to take advantage of the country's potential. The Asian Development Bank does the same. Aung San Suu Kyi insists both China and the United States remain Myanmar's friends, also notes that corruption and freedom of thought are challenges to its development.

    04/12/2008 RUSSIA
    Russian leaders exploit crisis to increase their power
    Heavy subsidies, especially for state-run companies already controlled by the leaders, and greater presence of the government, which is "buying" participation or key posts in business. But if the crisis continues, Moscow could have problems.

    23/06/2009 ASIA – ITALY
    Securities seized in Chiasso still between a wall of silence and a flow of disinformation
    Neither Italian nor US authorities have officially said whether the seized US Treasury bills worth US$ 134.5 billion are real or fake. A US Treasury spokesperson said they were fakes, but acknowledged that he only saw them in a photo on the internet. For Italy’s financial police, if they are forgeries, they are practically indistinguishable from the real stuff. Both the US Federal Reserve and the Bank of Japan have an interest in denying their authenticity.

    08/08/2011 CHINA – UNITED STATES – ASIA
    China sees its own downfall as US credit enters twilight
    The People’s Daily and Xinhua publish harsh commentaries about US politicians, their useless democracy, and US military adventurism. They are also a sign of fear that, as the US dollar goes, so will China with its US$ 1.16 trillion in US treasury bills. Beijing pleads for action.

    23/02/2009 CHINA - UNITED STATES
    China and U.S. breathe sigh of relief: economy more important than human rights
    For Mrs. Clinton, human rights will no longer be the main issue. In exchange, Beijing has decided to continue buying U.S. Treasury bonds, in order to support the American economy.



    Editor's choices

    CHINA - VATICAN
    Vatican silence over Shanghai’s Mgr Ma Daqin causing confusion and controversy

    Bernardo Cervellera

    For some, Mgr Ma’s blog post praising the Patriotic Association and acknowledging his mistakes is nothing but “dirt”. For others, he chose humiliation for the “sake of his diocese”. Many wonder why the Holy See has remained silent about the article’s content and the bishop’s persecution. Some suspect the Vatican views the episode in positive terms. Yet, the Ma Daqin affair raises a major question. Has Benedict XVI’s Letter to Chinese Catholics (which describes the Patriotic Association as “incompatible with Catholic doctrine”) been abolished? If it has, who did it? A journey of compromises without truth is full of risks.


    CHINA – VATICAN
    Mgr Ma Daqin: the text of his “confession”

    Mons. Taddeo Ma Daqin

    Four years after quitting the Chinese Patriotic Catholic Association, the bishop of Shanghai “admits” his faults on his blog, praising the organisation that controls the Church. We publish his article, almost in its entirety. Translation by AsiaNews.


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