6 March, 2015 AsiaNews.it Twitter AsiaNews.it Facebook            

Help AsiaNews | About us | P.I.M.E. | | RssNewsletter | Mobile





mediazioni e arbitrati, risoluzione alternativa delle controversie e servizi di mediazione e arbitrato
e-mail this to a friend printable version


» 05/17/2010
INDIA
Endless violence against Christian women of Kandhamal
by Santosh Digal
After anti-Christian pogroms of 2008-2009, the Christian women of Kandhamal have difficulty returning to their villages and resuming their lives. The Social Centre in Mumbai studies their problems to see how to help. The continuous support of the Church toward the persecuted.

Bhubaneswar (AsiaNews) – Christian women were beaten, abducted, suffered sexual and verbal violence during the August 2008-2009 anti-Christian pogrom in Kandhamal district, Orissa. Now a group of researchers connected with the College of Social Work Nirmala Niketan in Mumbai have conducted a research on the violence, the first step to finding a solution.

A team of 16 between 6 and 12 May interviewed a group of 300 women from several villages in Kandhamal, visiting the sites and their homes to gather information on their social situation and housing and families.

Sister Anita chat services, Daughters of the Heart of Mary, is a teacher at the Nirmala Niketan Center who participated in the research. She told AsiaNews that "women and girls of Kandhamal have suffered various forms of violence" such as cases of beatings, sexual violence, insults and threats, kidnapping, and have had to flee from their villages. According to information gathered, the Hindu extremist assailants belonged to different clans and tribes and came from different regions.

Sister Chata says that many women and their families are still traumatized by that time and are afraid to cultivate their land. Many women have reported a continuing state of anxiety, fear, tension, fear for their lives and those of their children at all times.

Sukumari Digal, 40, from Latingia village, mother of four children, now "only" suffers verbal violence and threats, along with other women of the village. But this has left a mark on her life and she says that together with other women, "we feel depressed. We do not feel for the land. Our cows have disappeared. " "I can not concentrate on daily chores, I am always afraid. I fear to travel on a bus. I feel great anxiety when any member of my family are away from home when the children are not with me. Now even I go to meet people I know and I feel ashamed and embarrassed when I talk with them. I feel anger toward those who should have protected me and did not do it. The situation is still tense and many people do not feel safe to return, because the refugee camps of the government are quite safe, but the village is not ". Sukumari says that about 50 girls and women of her village have fled to other cities looking for work and fearful for their safety. She has made reports to local police, but they have made no inquiries and no one was arrested for the violence. But they have help and support from priests, nuns and social workers.

"Despite all this, I feel no anger towards the people who caused all this."

Sunila Bhise, also a member of the research group from Mumbai, confirms that Kandhamal women continue to suffer from the violence. In their villages, they lack medical facilities, social opportunities and work security. Those who went home are finding it difficult to resume life as before. Others have gone to different cities.

Father Ajay Kumar Singh of the Archdiocese of Cuttack-Bhubaneshwar believes that the study should provide a credible framework for Kandhamal women. The Church and other groups of civil aid, based on similar reports, want to develop strategies to help women and the entire population of the area.

The study of the Nirmala Niketan is a scientific report and will be submittedto the National Commission for Human Rights and other pro-rights groups by August.  


e-mail this to a friend printable version

See also
11/13/2008 INDIA
Indian commission investigating anti-Christian pogrom in Orissa
08/07/2009 INDIA
For India’s Supreme Court kicking one’s wife is not an act of "cruelty"
by Nirmala Carvalho
07/29/2011 INDIA
Hindu radical kills Christian who had testified in court in a Kandhamal pogrom-related case
by Nirmala Carvalho
01/25/2011 INDIA
As anti-Christian violence continues, Orissa government fails to uphold the law
by Santosh Digal
07/01/2009 INDIA
Orissa: first conviction in anti-Christian riots case
by Nirmala Carvalho

Editor's choices
EGYPT - ISLAM
What Tayeb and Sisi said is big step towards a revolution in Islam
by Samir Khalil SamirThe grand imam of Al-Azhar slammed literalist interpretations of the Qur'an and the Sunnah, as fundamentalists and Islamic terrorists do. He supports the urgent need for Islam's reform, especially in terms of teaching lay people and clerics. He also calls for an end to mutual excommunication (takfir) between Sunnis and Shias. Egyptian President al-Sisi chose to fight the Islamic state group after it beheaded 21 Coptic Christians, whom he called "Egyptian citizens" with full rights.
SAUDI ARABIA - ISLAM
For head of Al-Azhar, religious education reform is needed to stop Islamic extremismFor Ahmed al-Tayeb, it is urgent to come up with new educational programmes to avoid "corrupt interpretations" of the Qur'an and Sunnah. Islamic terrorism undermines the unity of the Muslim world. He blames Mideast tensions on a "new global colonialism allied to world Zionism". a speech by the Saudi king is read at the conference.
HONG KONG - CHINA - VATICAN
It looks like someone is trying to shout us down
by Card. Joseph Zen Ze-kiunThe widespread optimism concerning the dialogue between the Holy See and China is largely groundless. Some Chinese bishops unable to speak freely are asked "leading" questions. The key issues remain unresolved, namely episcopal appointments and the fate of the Chinese Catholic Patriotic Association. Benedict XVI's Letter to Chinese Catholics, also cited by Pope Francis, provides guidelines. No agreement is better than a bad agreement. What happened to Msgr. Cosma Shi Enxiang and Msgr. James Su Zhimin? Hong Kong's bishop emeritus, champion of religious freedom in China, delivers a vibrant reflection.

Dossier

by Giulio Aleni / (a cura di) Gianni Criveller
pp. 176
Copyright © 2003 AsiaNews C.F. 00889190153 All rights reserved. Content on this site is made available for personal, non-commercial use only. You may not reproduce, republish, sell or otherwise distribute the content or any modified or altered versions of it without the express written permission of the editor. Photos on AsiaNews.it are largely taken from the internet and thus considered to be in the public domain. Anyone contrary to their publication need only contact the editorial office which will immediately proceed to remove the photos.