25 October, 2014 AsiaNews.it Twitter AsiaNews.it Facebook            

Help AsiaNews | About us | P.I.M.E. | | RssNewsletter | Mobile





mediazioni e arbitrati, risoluzione alternativa delle controversie e servizi di mediazione e arbitrato
e-mail this to a friend printable version


» 10/21/2005
CHINA
In Shanghai three-month old baby up for on sale on internet
Detailed offer to sale a baby appears on an internet site. The government spends only five dollars a month on orphans; its lack of interest in orphan care favours baby kidnapping and sale to childless couples.

Beijing (AsiaNews/SCMP) – Henan child born in last 100 days for sale; price: 28,000 yuan (US$ 3,500) for boys and 13,000 yuan (US$ 1,600) for girls. This is the offer—unusual to say the least—that appeared on an online auction house and signed by a username calling himself or herself Chuangxinzhe Yongyuan (forever innovator). More than 50 people browsed the posting, including one who left a message of enquiry.

The "baby supplier" explained the offer was meant to "help the country's millions of infertile couples".

The website removed the posting as soon as it realised what was being advertised and reported the matter to police which launched an investigation.

Such an offer is unusual insofar as how it was advertising but abducting and selling children is a widespread criminal activity in China, even if it carries penalties that include jail sentences and capital punishment.

Last August seven leaders of a child abduction ring were sentenced to death and executed. The other 45 ring members were given prison sentences ranging from five years to life. In 2003, the gang had kidnapped 61 children in Guizhou province for resale to families in Henan and Hebei provinces. Of these, only 25 children were eventually found but many of them could not be reunited with their families because it was impossible to track down their natural parents. Thus, they joined the ranks of China 573,000 official orphans.

According to a joint study by China's Ministry of Civil Affairs, the Save the Children Fund and Beijing Normal University, Chinese orphans receive little government assistance; more than a third receive no aid whatsoever and for many there is no medical care and education.

The report found that 86 per cento of all orphans live in rural areas but, whilst in cities 70 per cent receive some form of local government assistance, in the countryside only half does.

In many provinces, the aid orphans receive is merely symbolic. "In these areas, payments do not cover even a quarter of a normal child's daily living expenses, and in many regions, it's as little as a tenth," said Shang Xiaoyuan, professor at the Beijing Normal University, who took part in the study. "Many orphans are living in extreme poverty, especially in rural areas".

Around 78 per cent of all orphans live with relatives, but some 69,000 are housed in public institutions. Henan holds the bulk of these children with some 50,000.

In farming regions government subsidies average 1,190 yuan (US$ 132) a year, but in some provinces like Guizhou, Hunan and Guangxi Zhuang, it does not exceed 50 yuan (US$ 6) a month.

Kate Wedgwood, China Programme Director for Save the Children, said the number of orphans is calculated on the basis of central government data, but the real numbers could be much higher.

Many experts believe that the government's lack of care for orphans favours abductions and sale to childless couples. In such a "market", baby boys are deemed "quality goods" and sold at prices more than twice that of baby girls, who are usually seen as "substandard".

The problem is widespread because of the high number of infertile couples, China's 'one-child policy' and the popular preference for boys over girls. (PB) 


e-mail this to a friend printable version

See also
05/22/2009 CHINA
New raid on disabled-slaves in Anhui brick factories
11/24/2005 China
Charity workers in Hunan orphanage arrested for selling babies
06/22/2007 CHINA
“Police and villagers” knew about the slaves
05/26/2008 CHINA
Traffickers stealing babies from under the rubbles caused by the quake
09/27/2006 CHINA
Gender disparity increases: 121 males born for every 100 women

Editor's choices
IRAQ - ITALY
Almost 700,000 euros raised as the 'Adopt a Christian from Mosul' campaign continues
by Bernardo CervelleraA second instalment is sent with funds raised in September. The fate of East-West relations is being played out in the Middle East and Iraq. Pope Francis and the Synod issue an appeal. Governments are lukewarm. Aid is coming from around the world. A new international community is defeating the "globalisation of indifference."
IRAQ-VATICAN
"Adopt a Christian from Mosul": Archbishops’ thanks as first aid arrives
by Amel NonaMsgr. Amel Nona, the Chaldean Archbishop of Mosul, who is also a refugee himself, thanks all the donors to the AsiaNews campaign. The situation is increasingly difficult given the huge number of refugees and the arrival of winter and snow, making outdoor shelters and tents impossible. The crisis, an occasion that activates the faith of Christians.
ITALY - IRAQ
After raising € 350,000, 'Adopt a Christian from Mosul' campaign continues
by Bernardo CervelleraDonations raised up to 31 August have been sent to the patriarch of Baghdad and the bishops of Kurdistan. The campaign helps to feed, house, clothe, and bring comfort to more than 150,000 Christian, Yazidi, Turkmen, Shia and Sunni refugees who fled the violence of the army of the Islamic Caliphate. People in Italy and around the world have been generous, including the poor and the unemployed, a sign of hope for the world as well as those who suffer and those who give.

Dossier

by Giulio Aleni / (a cura di) Gianni Criveller
pp. 176
Copyright © 2003 AsiaNews C.F. 00889190153 All rights reserved. Content on this site is made available for personal, non-commercial use only. You may not reproduce, republish, sell or otherwise distribute the content or any modified or altered versions of it without the express written permission of the editor. Photos on AsiaNews.it are largely taken from the internet and thus considered to be in the public domain. Anyone contrary to their publication need only contact the editorial office which will immediately proceed to remove the photos.