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mediazioni e arbitrati, risoluzione alternativa delle controversie e servizi di mediazione e arbitrato
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» 09/21/2012
ISLAM - MIDDLE EAST
Libya, Benghazi youth march against violence and terrorism
In the capital of Cyrenaica thousands take part in the protest march organized to counteract the excessive power of Islamist militiamen. Young people ask the guerrillas responsible for the death of American Ambassador Stevens to abandon their weapons and join the regular army. In Pakistan, the violent protests continue against the blasphemous video on Muhammad and the French satirical cartoons. Peaceful demonstrations in Cairo.

Benghazi (AsiaNews) - On the day of protests held in various Muslim countries against the blasphemous video on Muhammad and the French satirical cartoons, young Libyans (pictured) lined up against terrorism and violence. In Benghazi, place of the attack on the U.S. Embassy, which cost the life of the diplomat Christopher Stevens, the Libyan Youth Movement held a peaceful March of thousands against the protests organised by Islamists in front of Western consulates. Young members of the movement are demanding the end of terrorism and invite Islamist militias responsible for the attack on the Consulate to put down their weapons and join the regular army. During the March, the demonstrators also chanted slogans in favour of security, accusing the police of being hostage to the guerrillas.    

Meanwhile there continue in Pakistan and Egypt the anti-Western protests, which began last September 12 with the diffusion of the film "The Innocence of Muslims". In Pakistan, the "day of love for the prophet" called by the government gave rise to violent clashes in Karachi and Peshawar, where protestors attacked a movie theater. In Islamabab the authorities deployed the army, after clashes occurred with police during the night. So far no churches or Christian building or those of other religious minorities have been attacked.

In Egypt, hundreds of Islamists gathered after Friday prayers in front of the French Embassy in Cairo to protest the satirical cartoons of Mohammed published last September 19 by the weekly Charlie Hebdo. Yesterday, Paris ordered the closure of the diplomatic offices and French schools in Cairo and in 19 other countries.

Fr. Rafic Greiche, spokesman of the Catholic Church in Egypt, said that "so far the situation is calm; the Salafis have urged their members to demonstrate peacefully. However, there are fears for the intrusion of violent groups that often exploit events to cause havoc and clash with law enforcement". By order of the Egyptian President Morsi, engaged in a visit to the United Nations Headquarters, also the Muslim Brotherhood have deserted the event.

"The Muslim population wants to give a different image of Islam," the priest underlined, "in Egyptian newspapers there have appeared many articles critical of the assault on the U.S. Embassy on September 12. According to many political and religious leaders, the images of anti-Western hatred which appeared on networks around the world are a wonderful advertisement for the creators of the anti-Islamic film and detractors of the Muslim religion". The same Muslim Brotherhood has accepted the invitation of French Prime Minister Jean-Marc Ayrault who instead of violent demonstrations has recommended legal action against the satirical French newspaper. Yesterday, Abdel-Moneim Abdel-Maqsoud, a lawyer member of the brotherhood announced the formation of a team of French and Egyptian lawyers to evaluate the crime of inciting inter-religious hatred committed by the perpetrators at Charlie Hebdo.    

Even Tunisia, home to the Islamists of Ennahda (Muslim Brotherhood), opposes manifestations of anti-Western hatred. After announcements of new demonstrations by Salafis, the Tunisian authorities banned any demonstrations in the city center. Since yesterday the army has guarded the diplomatic headquarters and foreign schools. (S.C.) 

 

 

 


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See also
02/21/2013 SYRIA
Carbombing rocks Damascus, 53 dead
09/30/2011 MIDDLE EAST-ISLAM
Anatomy of fear. A Sunni democracy in defence of Christians
by Élie Fayad
09/14/2011 MIDDLE EAST - ITALY
The Christians of the Near East and Islamist ideology
by Bernardo Cervellera
10/25/2011 MIDDLE EAST
The women of the Arab Spring on the need to establish democracy
by Giulia Mazza
09/27/2011 ISLAM
M.E revolts and Arab Christians: a justified prudence
by Habib Mohammed Hadi Sadr

Editor's choices
EGYPT - ISLAM
What Tayeb and Sisi said is big step towards a revolution in Islam
by Samir Khalil SamirThe grand imam of Al-Azhar slammed literalist interpretations of the Qur'an and the Sunnah, as fundamentalists and Islamic terrorists do. He supports the urgent need for Islam's reform, especially in terms of teaching lay people and clerics. He also calls for an end to mutual excommunication (takfir) between Sunnis and Shias. Egyptian President al-Sisi chose to fight the Islamic state group after it beheaded 21 Coptic Christians, whom he called "Egyptian citizens" with full rights.
SAUDI ARABIA - ISLAM
For head of Al-Azhar, religious education reform is needed to stop Islamic extremismFor Ahmed al-Tayeb, it is urgent to come up with new educational programmes to avoid "corrupt interpretations" of the Qur'an and Sunnah. Islamic terrorism undermines the unity of the Muslim world. He blames Mideast tensions on a "new global colonialism allied to world Zionism". a speech by the Saudi king is read at the conference.
HONG KONG - CHINA - VATICAN
It looks like someone is trying to shout us down
by Card. Joseph Zen Ze-kiunThe widespread optimism concerning the dialogue between the Holy See and China is largely groundless. Some Chinese bishops unable to speak freely are asked "leading" questions. The key issues remain unresolved, namely episcopal appointments and the fate of the Chinese Catholic Patriotic Association. Benedict XVI's Letter to Chinese Catholics, also cited by Pope Francis, provides guidelines. No agreement is better than a bad agreement. What happened to Msgr. Cosma Shi Enxiang and Msgr. James Su Zhimin? Hong Kong's bishop emeritus, champion of religious freedom in China, delivers a vibrant reflection.

Dossier

by Giulio Aleni / (a cura di) Gianni Criveller
pp. 176
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