03/07/2011, 00.00
EGYPT

Muslim Brotherhood’s power growing from the Jasmine Revolution

A source tells AsiaNews that Muslim extremists are behind recent attacks against police stations and secret service offices. They probably tried to destroy their files, whilst giving a different spin on the raids. Other sources note that Islamists are still a minority in the country, as most Egyptians, Christians and Muslims, are still committed to their country’s future. People continue to be uneasy about poor security.

Cairo (AsiaNews) – “The Muslim Brotherhood is reaping the benefits of the Jasmine revolution, which began as a real coming together of all Egyptians, Christians and Muslims,” a source told AsiaNews, anonymous for security reasons. Groups linked to the Muslim Brotherhood recently stormed police stations and secret service offices to destroy files containing information about their activities. This version of events is different from what international media reported. The latter claimed that ordinary Egyptians attacked such sites to stop the destruction of papers documenting abuses and torture of dissidents under the Mubarak regime.

According to the source, many Christians still feel threatened by the lack of security, as the recent attack against the Coptic community in the village of Soul indicates. On that occasion, Muslims set fire to a local church, forcing thousands of people to flee.

“The West should remain focused on Egypt. The active intervention of Europe and the international community, by qualifying the recognition of any new government, could positively influence the Jasmine Revolution,” the source said.

However, the future of the revolution is uncertain, this according to other sources. For them, “the country is in a mess.”

Even though life has started to go back to normal in Cairo and the main cities, with schools and offices reopening, one major problem remains, namely “the lack of security”. At the same time, “we do not know what will happen to the country.”

Given the uncertain future, the Muslim Brotherhood, which is well organised, could take advantage of the situation to take over. However, “they are a minority, and young people are still very active in society, and want to transform Egypt along democratic lines.”

Printable version
CLOSE X
See also
The new electoral law benefits former regime and the Muslim Brotherhood
29/09/2011
Egypt, after 60 years Muslim Brotherhood party admitted to elections
07/06/2011
Egypt, clashes between police and demonstrators: 12 dead and nearly 500 injured
26/01/2013
Tens of thousands of people in Tahrir Square to protect Egypt’s Arab and Islamic identity
29/07/2011
Muslim Brotherhood wants to gag every Egyptian, Jasmine Revolution leader says
02/04/2013