27 June 2016
AsiaNews.it Twitter AsiaNews.it Facebook
Geographic areas




  • > Africa
  • > Central Asia
  • > Europe
  • > Middle East
  • > Nord America
  • > North Asia
  • > South Asia
  •    - Afghanistan
  •    - Bangladesh
  •    - Bhutan
  •    - India
  •    - Nepal
  •    - Pakistan
  •    - Sri Lanka
  • > South East Asia
  • > South West Asia
  • > Sud America
  • > East Asia

  • mediazioni e arbitrati, risoluzione alternativa delle controversie e servizi di mediazione e arbitrato


    » 03/02/2011, 00.00

    PAKISTAN

    Pain and sorrow of the Pakistani Church and the world over the murder of Shahbaz Bhatti



    For the bishop of Islamabad, it is a sad and bitter day for the entire country. He remembers the minister as a “devout Catholic” who lived under “constant threat”, but now “enough is enough”. A source tells AsiaNews that fundamentalists are operating like a “state within a state”, perpetrating crimes and violence with impunity. Indian Christians express their solidarity to their fellow Christians in Pakistan, calling for the repeal of the blasphemy law. Vatican spokesman expresses sorrow, demanding respect for the “right to religious freedom”.

    Islamabad (AsiaNews) – “It is a sad incident, a sad day not only for minorities” but also “for humanity,” said Mgr Rufin Anthony, bishop of Islamabad-Rawalpindi as he spoke to AsiaNews, after hearing the news about the coldblooded murder of Minority Affairs Minister Shahbaz Bhatti. “This should be an eye opener for minorities and the government. How much more blood will it take to realise that enough is enough,” he said. Indeed, how much time will it take for Pakistan to find peace and harmony. In the meantime, a Christian source, anonymous for security reasons, said that there is a “state within the state”, made up of fundamentalist elements “who commit crimes and act with total impunity”.  

    As he remembered Shahbaz Bhatti’s precious work on behalf of Catholics and other minorities, Mgr Anthony could not stop speaking of such a “sad incident,” a bitter day not only for minorities but for mankind as well.

    The prelate knew the minister’s everyday schedule. “Bhatti’s daily routine was that he used to go to meet his mother, pray with her. He used to call me and ask me to pray for him every morning,” the bishop said.

    Badly shaken by the murder, he went on talking about Bhatti. “I remember him as a child; he regularly attended the Church; he was passionate since childhood. He was under threat and the government did not provide sufficient security.” He “was a brave man, a man of courage, he took a stand for the minorities,” the bishop of Islamabad reiterated.

    “When he took the oath for the new cabinet,” after President Ali Zardari had it reshuffled, “he said he would fight till the last drop of his blood. He proved himself, stood firm and paid the price by his blood. This should be an eye opener for minorities and the government. How much more blood will it take to realise that enough is enough,” he concluded.

    In the meantime, a Christian source, anonymous for security reasons, said that there is a “state within the state”, made up of fundamentalist elements “who commit crimes and act with total impunity”.  

    “There are elements working inside the government. There is a state within the state,” the source explained, “that is more powerful, moved by an extremist ideology”

    “By contrast, ordinary citizens, civil society, moderate Muslims, i.e. the majority, want to live peacefully, but they are powerless vis-à-vis fanatical and fundamentalist movements.” In the end, such a “deplorable incident” takes away “courage and hope from religious minorities and civil society.”

    This is the second high profile murder after the assassination of Punjab Governor Salman Taseer, “who was killed for his opposition to the blasphemy law and his work in favour of religious minorities”.

    The end result will be that “Minorities will be silenced, their voice suppressed along with those who defend them.” On this occasion as in previous ones, “violence is committed in the name of religion.”

    Indian Christians also slammed the brutal murder of Shahbaz Bhatti, killed because he opposed the draconian blasphemy law. Human rights activists have appealed to the United Nations and the international community to put pressures on the government of Pakistan, which so far has been unable to stop extremists.

    Sajan George, president of the Global Council o Indian Christians (GCIC), called for the “immediate repeal of Pakistan’s blasphemy laws”.

    On previous occasions, the “GCIC asked the Indian government to raise the matter with the United Nations Human Rights Council (UNHRC), the Pakistani government and with the international community to save the life of the mother of two children sentenced to death,” namely Asia Bibi.

    For the GCIC, the Pakistani government has “sponsored Islamic terror against minorities and women,” and this might “trigger cycles of violence in other Islamic nations against minorities.”

    The Vatican also sent words of grief. The assassination of Pakistani Minority Affairs Minister Shabbaz Bhatti is a “new act of violence of a terrible gravity,” Vatican spokesman Fr Federico Lombardi said.  It shows the correctness of papal warnings against anti-Christian violence and threats to religious freedom.

    "To our prayers for the victim, our condemnation of the act of unspeakable violence, our closeness to the Pakistani Christians subject to hate, we add an appeal concerning the dramatic urgency of the defence of religious freedom and of Christians who are suffering from violence and persecution," the director of the Vatican Press Office added. (DS)

    (Jibran Khan and Nirmala Carvalho contributed to the article)

    e-mail this to a friend Printable version










    See also

    03/03/2011 PAKISTAN
    Bhatti assassination: funeral tomorrow in Punjab as Muslims condemn the murder
    Pakistan’s Minority Affairs minister will be laid to rest in his native village. Hundreds of people protest in Islamabad, setting tyres on fire and shouting slogans. Muslim religious leaders and scholars deplore the “brutal murder”. The press slams a weak government, incapable of stopping the violence.

    04/03/2011 PAKISTAN
    Bhatti funeral: Christians angry when worshippers and relatives denied access to church
    Police seal off church after Prime Minister Gilani enters the building. Ordinary worshippers and relatives of the slain minister are kept outside. Christians react with outrage, close ranks around the family. The bishop of Islamabad says he lost a “son”. Speaking to AsiaNews, he blames the Interior minister for the minister’s death. Bhatti is laid to rest in Khushpur with thousands in attendance, including Muslims, Hindus and Sikhs.

    30/03/2011 PAKISTAN
    Shahbaz Batthi killed by a "mafia" of fundamentalists holding the government hostage
    The minister for minorities, Salman Taseer and other victims of the "organized movement" fighting for power. The violence has raised such fear that that any discussion about the law on blasphemy has been dropped. But Christians must cultivate the hope and with the help of the universal Church, build a better future.

    23/06/2011 PAKISTAN
    Doubts and surprise among Christians over the first arrest in the Shahbaz Bhatti murder case
    After a long period of silence, it is “odd” that the one person who is arrested is an employee of the slain minister who worked for him for ten years, the bishop of Islamabad noted. A Catholic activist finds the direction of the investigation “surprising” and full of oddities. The job of the minister’s brother Paul is at risk, but for the latter it is “premature” to say anything about the probe, urging everyone to wait for the end of the interrogations.

    07/01/2013 PAKISTAN
    Punjab: Christians remember Salman Taseer and his courageous stance against blasphemy
    Lahore priest slams murderer's hero status. In fighting against the 'black law', Punjab governor gave his life for Asia Bibi and minorities. The fate of his son, seized by an extremist group in August 2011, is still uncertain.



    Editor's choices

    CHINA - VATICAN
    Vatican silence over Shanghai’s Mgr Ma Daqin causing confusion and controversy

    Bernardo Cervellera

    For some, Mgr Ma’s blog post praising the Patriotic Association and acknowledging his mistakes is nothing but “dirt”. For others, he chose humiliation for the “sake of his diocese”. Many wonder why the Holy See has remained silent about the article’s content and the bishop’s persecution. Some suspect the Vatican views the episode in positive terms. Yet, the Ma Daqin affair raises a major question. Has Benedict XVI’s Letter to Chinese Catholics (which describes the Patriotic Association as “incompatible with Catholic doctrine”) been abolished? If it has, who did it? A journey of compromises without truth is full of risks.


    CHINA – VATICAN
    Mgr Ma Daqin: the text of his “confession”

    Mons. Taddeo Ma Daqin

    Four years after quitting the Chinese Patriotic Catholic Association, the bishop of Shanghai “admits” his faults on his blog, praising the organisation that controls the Church. We publish his article, almost in its entirety. Translation by AsiaNews.


    AsiaNews IS ALSO A MONTHLY!

    AsiaNews monthly magazine (in Italian) is free.
     

    SUBSCRIBE NOW

    News feed

    Canale RSScanale RSS 

    Add to Google









     

    IRAN 2016 Banner

    2003 © All rights reserved - AsiaNews C.F. e P.Iva: 00889190153 - GLACOM®