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» 07/17/2013
TURKEY
Patriarch Bartholomew sympathises with Gezi Park protests, remembers bishops abducted in Syria
by NAT da Polis
For the Ecumenical Patriarch, the desire for democracy and justice is growing in Turkish society even though it creates "divisions and polarisation." He calls on the Turkish government to work for the release of the two abducted prelates from the Patriarchate of Antioch, and to keep its promise to reopen the Halki Theological School.

Istanbul (AsiaNews) - Ramadan has not stopped anti-government protests, which began with the events of Gezi Park. At an iftar (the traditional dinner after the daily fast during Ramadan) offered by the mayor of Istanbul to the heads of non-Muslim religious minorities, the Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew I showed his interest in and sympathy for the protests, which are a sign of the growing desire for democracy and justice in Turkish society.

Turkish and foreign authorities were present at the meal to which the patriarch was invited. On this occasion, Bartholomew expressed his thoughts on the unrest that trouble Turkey, but also on the fate of Christianity in the Middle East.

In a veiled reference to the protests in Gezi Park, the patriarch said, "We are excited and joyful witnesses to important facts that seek to find a solution to long-standing situations that have accumulated over the years in Turkish society even though they cause divisions and polarisation."

Bartholomew also expressed appreciation for "the many steps taken by the current government and Prime Minister Erdogan, on issues affecting minorities, who have been discriminated against and have endured quite a lot of suffering."

"Despite the difficulties experienced," he added, "we have managed to survive and our coexistence in Turkish society resembles a variegated garden, where flowers are able to live side by side."

However, "I wonder and cannot understand," he noted, "how it is that Turkey, which is looking for solutions to the Kurdish question and ways to reform its constitution for a more overt democratisation of society, is not able to re-open the Theological School in Halki, improperly closed for 42 years, despite much-repeated and hopeful promises. "

"All this," Bartholomew said, "shows how in this society it is still difficult to reach and take certain important decisions."

In his brief but tough speech, Bartholomew mentioned the kidnapping of Paulos and Ioannis, metropolitans in the Patriarchate of Antioch and Syrian Jacobite Church, expressing concern for their fate and inviting all those present at the iftar dinner to pray for them.

At the same time, he appealed to the Turkish government to intensify the search for their whereabouts. The two prelates were kidnapped by rebel groups, opponents of the regime in Damascus, supported by Turkey.

"Their seizure," said Bartholomew, "has much troubled the Christian world and is raising many concerns about the fate of all Christians in the Middle East, which is becoming increasingly dangerous."

At the end of his speech, there was a muted applause. For his part, the mayor of Istanbul expressed his usual stance in favour of reopening Halki.


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See also
06/13/2013 TURKEY
Erdogan proposes a referendum on Gezi Park, but demands the end of Taksim Square rallies
06/05/2013 TURKEY
In Turkey's complicated situation, Erdogan could lose everything
by NAT da Polis
09/21/2007 TURKEY
Burns assures Patriarch of US support for school of theology
12/22/2009 TURKEY
Ecumenical Patriarch “crucified”
by NAT da Polis
07/15/2013 TURKEY
Despite the world's indifference, Gezi Park continues to speak out loudly

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