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    » 01/08/2010, 00.00

    RUSSIA - CHINA - IRAN

    Russia, China and Iran to forge a new energy axis this year



    The Iran-Turkmenistan gas pipeline is inaugurated on 6 January. More are expected to link Russia, Iran and China through Central Asia. Europe appears to be losing the race for Caspian Sea and Central Asian oil and gas; it might end up dependent on Moscow for supplies.
    Moscow (AsiaNews/Agencies) – The Dauletabad-Sarakhs-Khangiran pipeline was inaugurated on Wednesday connecting Iran's northern Caspian region with Turkmenistan's vast gas field. Increasingly, Iran is turning to China and Russia not only as buyers of its gas but also as builders of pipelines. Moscow and Beijing are thus making inroads into Central Asia's vast energy reservoir. By contrast, Europe and the United States are still at the discussion stage when it comes to building pipelines towards the West.

    The 182-kilometer Turkmen-Iranian pipeline starts "modestly" with the pumping of 8 billion cubic meters (bcm) of Turkmen gas, but will meet the energy requirements of Iran's Caspian region. Its annual capacity is however 20bcm, which will allow Iran to export its own gas to the east.

    The pipeline could be extended through Turkmenistan to the northern shore of the Caspian sea and from there, be connected to a gas pipeline Russia and China are discussing that would link the Russian Black Sea port of Novorossiysk to Alashankou on Sino-Kazakh border.

    Russia, Iran and Turkmenistan hold respectively the world's largest, second-largest and fourth-largest gas reserves and China needs a lot of energy and is willing to invest heavily to get it.

    At the same time, Moscow wants to remain Europe's main gas supplier. Chinese competition in Central Asia and the Caspian region are thus not a major irritant. Moscow in fact is already well-entrenched in the area with its own installations and has developed its own ties with the region's countries. Thus, no energy flows from the region towards Europe. At the same time, Moscow has offered Turkmenistan a better price than China for its gas. Indeed, Russia relies on Turkmen gas for its domestic need and exports its own gas to Europe at a higher price.

    Iran is isolated by Western sanctions and is turning more and more eastward and towards Russia.

    Iran and Turkmenistan have forged closer ties recently, thanks in part to the intervention of Russian President Dmitry Medvedev.

    The overall situation is complicated  by Turkey's desire to become a hub for energy flowing to Europe. For this reason, the Turkish government has downplayed the existing 2,577km pipeline connecting Tabriz in north-western Iran with Ankara.

    This intricate pattern of relations spells the end of US policy towards Caspian oil and gas, which was designed to bypass Russia, whilst keeping China out and Iran isolated.

    Russia is now planning to strengthen its ties with Azerbaijan, further undermining Western efforts to engage Baku as a supplier for Nabucco. In tandem with Russia, Iran and Azerbaijan in December inked an agreement to deliver gas to Iran through the 1,400km Kazi-Magomed-Astara pipeline.

    Conscious that it has fewer cards to play, Europe is pushing for Russia's South Stream and North Stream, which will supply gas to northern and southern Europe.

    The stumbling blocks for North Stream have been cleared as Denmark (in October), Finland and Sweden (in November) and Germany (in December) approved the project. Construction should begin in the spring.

    The new pipeline will bypass Soviet-era transit routes via Ukraine, Poland and Belarus and run from the north-western Russian port of Vyborg to the German port of Greifswald along a 1,220km route under the Baltic Sea.

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    See also

    10/08/2009 IRAN – TURKMENISTAN
    More Turkmen gas for Iran, less for Europe
    Turkmenistan plans to sell Iran 14 billion cubic metres of natural gas per year. Iran is willing to pay market prices. The two countries have recently shown to share common goals, for example over the Caspian Sea’s mineral riches.

    23/10/2010 TURKMENISTAN- RUSSIA-CHINA-
    Turkmenistan seeks new markets for its gas
    Russian President Medvedev on a visit to Ashgabat, signs a deal to buy 11 billion cubic meters of gas, but before Moscow bought 40 bcm. The country wants to sell energy, its main resource, and looks to Iran and China. Problems with the European market and India.

    14/05/2007 RUSSIA – CENTRAL ASIA
    Putin tightens control over Central Asian energy
    Russia, Kazakhstan and Turkmenistan agree to build new pipelines to carry Turkmen gas through Russia. European hopes for a pipeline under the Caspian Sea are dashed. Turkmen president tries to be reassuring saying that he is studying other routes as well. For experts, China is Russia’s main rival in the area.

    25/04/2007 RUSSIA – TURKMENISTAN
    Oil and gas at the centre of Turkmen president’s visit to Moscow
    Russia and the United States are vying for access to Turkmenistan’s rich energy resources. Once again Putin puts forward proposal to build pipeline that runs across Russian territory, but Berdymukhamedov makes no commitment. His decisions will play a key role in world energy politics.

    07/09/2006 RUSSIA – TURKMENISTAN
    Turkmenistan raises gas prices by 50 per cent, Russia pays
    Russian energy giant Gazprom accepts to pay US$ 100 for 1,000 cubic metres of gas, up from 65. Moscow is vying for monopoly control over energy, looking eastward.



    Editor's choices

    CHINA – VATICAN
    Global Times: the pope should accept the independence of the Chinese Church



    After 24 hours of silence, China’s media today published excerpts, comments and editorials about Pope Francis’ interview with Asia Times. Although the pope did not address religious issues or Church problems, many saw the interview as an attempt to improve diplomatic relations between China and the Vatican, and advised Francis to accept Mao Zedong’s "three principles of independence" (theology, administration, jurisdiction), which would leave the power to appoint bishops in the hands of the Party. The People's Daily’s Global Times publishes an editorial on the issue.


    INDIA – PHILIPPINES
    Archbishop of Guwahati: In Asia religion is not dying, the faithful take strength from the Eucharist



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