28 July 2016
AsiaNews.it Twitter AsiaNews.it Facebook
Geographic areas




  • > Africa
  • > Central Asia
  • > Europe
  • > Middle East
  • > Nord America
  • > North Asia
  • > South Asia
  •    - Afghanistan
  •    - Bangladesh
  •    - Bhutan
  •    - India
  •    - Nepal
  •    - Pakistan
  •    - Sri Lanka
  • > South East Asia
  • > South West Asia
  • > Sud America
  • > East Asia

  • mediazioni e arbitrati, risoluzione alternativa delle controversie e servizi di mediazione e arbitrato


    » 03/21/2013, 00.00

    NEPAL

    Govt sets up special commission for Christian cemeteries

    Kalpit Parajuli

    Nepal's interim government under Khil Raj Regmi is behind the commission. It will select burial locations before 15 July, ending decades of dispute between Hindus and Christians. The lack of space has forced minorities to bury their dead one on top of the other, up to ten per tomb.

    Kathmandu (AsiaNews) - Nepal's new government has set up a special commission to establish a cemetery for the country's Christian and Kirati minorities. This comes after the new cabinet of Prime Minister Khil Raj Regmi, the current Chief Justice, was sworn in to replace the government of Maoist leader Baburan Bhattarai

    For decades, Christians and tribal Kiratis have been embroiled in controversy over burial grounds. As majority Hindus cremate their dead, they fail to understand the needs of those who bury their dead and oppose their demands.

    Until recently, Christians and Kirati had to buy land with their own money to bury their dead. However, their tombs were frequently desecrated and burial plots seized. In many places, land is so scarce that a single tomb might contain up to ten bodies.

    Now a 16-member commission led by Binod Pahadi, a former member of the constituent assembly, will look into the matter. C.B. Gahatraj, general secretary of Federation of National Christian Nepal (FNCN), is one of its members.

    Over the next four months, the commission will scout for possible sites in each of the country's 75 districts and have them identified by 15 July.

    "We are more hopeful this time. In the past, former Maoist and Communist administrations tried to use minorities for political purposes," Gahatraj said. "The new government is made up of bureaucrats who do not have any political party interests."

    Space is especially scarce in Kathmandu because of speculation. The amount of accessible land is at a premium. Areas reserved for Christians and other minorities have consequently shrunk.

    In 2009, Christians were granted access to a forest near Shleshmantak, not far from the Hindu temple of Pashupatinath as a way around the problem. However, this sparked Hindu protests across the country. In the end, the authorities were forced to backtrack and ban its use for burials.

    A ruling by Nepal's Supreme Court lifted the ban in 2011, but police and temple authorities still refuse to allow Christians to bury their dead in the forest, occasionally resorting to violence to do so.

    Since February 2011, Christians, Muslims and Kiratis have staged regular protests against the repressive attitude of local authorities. The latter appear less interested in solving the problem than in putting it off. None of the agreements they have signed over the years has ever been implemented.

    e-mail this to a friend Printable version










    See also

    22/02/2010 NEPAL
    No space for Christians and Muslims to bury their dead in Kathmandu
    Rapid unplanned urbanisation has led the government to give Hindus land earmarked for Christian, Muslim and Baha’i minorities, groups that do not cremate their dead. This is causing tensions between Hindus and other religious groups.

    01/04/2014 NEPAL
    Nepal's religious minorities tell government to be "secular" and not just support Hindus
    Nepali authorities are spending millions on Maha Kumbh Mela, a Hindu festival, helping set up free accommodations for 10 million people. Christians, Muslims and Buddhists are united in demanding equal treatment for all. Protestant leader slams the authorities for ignoring Christian demand for "land to turn to build a cemetery," something that "is not fair," he says.

    21/05/2012 NEPAL
    Christians, Muslims and Hindus for coexistence without confrontation
    In the past 25 days, tribal groups have brought the country to a halt with strikes and violent demonstrations ahead of 28 May, date when the new constitution will come into effect. Tribals want an ethnically based federal state. The government deploys troops to avoid more clashes between ethnic minorities and Hindus.

    13/04/2007 NEPAL
    Muslim minority wants quotas in parliament and civil service
    Muslims claim that despite the end of the theocratic monarchy Nepal remains a Hindu state. They want guarantees and quotas for their minority. Members of other minorities agree. For them it is essential that Nepal become a secular state.

    19/12/2009 INDIA
    India: Parliament set to discuss proposed equal rights for Dalit Christians, Muslims
    The National Commission on Religious and Linguistic Minorities has submitted to the Lok Sabha the proposed amendment of the law which for 59 years divides Dalits according to their religious affiliation. Is the first time that the issue is discussed by the parliament in New Delhi.



    Editor's choices

    POLAND - CHINA - WYD
    Beijing's tricks and violence to stop Chinese youth from reaching WYD

    Vincenzo Faccioli Pintozzi

    The government yesterday blocked a group of 50 young pilgrims who had already boarded a plane bound for Krakow. Interrogated for hours by immigration, they were "admonished" and sent home with orders not to contact anyone abroad. Meanwhile, "young Chinese Catholics" hang around central World Youth Day locations in groups of five or six, with the task of spying on fellow countrymen. They work for cultural institutes or Chinese companies in Poland.


    ISLAM - EUROPE
    Fr Samir: Islamic terror in France and Germany a crisis of integration, but above all of politics

    Samir Khalil Samir

    The kidnapping and murder of a priest near Rouen (France) and the various attacks in Würzburg, Munich, Ansbach (Germany) were carried out by young people, who were indoctrinated with ease. Germany was a model for the integration of refugees. But radical Islam cannot be assimilated. It is supported by Saudi Arabia and Qatar. There is no other road other than integration. But we must tell the truth: the Koran contains elements of war and violence. Western politicians suffer from ignorance and a loss of all moral sentiment.


    AsiaNews IS ALSO A MONTHLY!

    AsiaNews monthly magazine (in Italian) is free.
     

    SUBSCRIBE NOW

    News feed

    Canale RSScanale RSS 

    Add to Google









     

    IRAN 2016 Banner

    2003 © All rights reserved - AsiaNews C.F. e P.Iva: 00889190153 - GLACOM®