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    » 01/16/2009, 00.00

    TURKEY

    Unity Week in Turkey where Christians are truly close to one another

    Mavi Zambak

    In Istanbul as well as Ankara the country’s various Christian communities are used to small but tangible acts of solidarity and communion. In the capital’s only parish church, run by the Jesuits, ecumenism is the stuff of everyday life.
    Istanbul (AsiaNews) – The decision to start the Week of Prayer for Christian Unity at the Aya Triada Kilisesi of Kadikoy, i.e. the Church of the Holy Trinity of Chalcedon, was not fortuitous. Chalcedon, today’s Kadikoy, is a posh residential neighbourhood on the Asian side of Istanbul, on the shore of the Sea of Marmara, facing glorious Saint Sophia, the ancient basilica-turned-mosques-turned museum by decree of the Turkish government. Here in the country that saw the first councils, where the Church first split, attempts are underway to put back together the many broken pieces of the centuries-old, but still lively Christian community.

    Whatever their rite or confession Turkey’s Christians—a tiny minority representing 0.2 per cent in this country of 70 million—have opened the doors of their churches ever since Athenagoras and Paul VI embraced in this city in 1965. Through a thousand acts of solidarity and communion, they have embarked on the inescapable path of ecumenism.

    Thus, symbolically embodying leaders and ordinary people in their daily and weekly experiences, Christians will meet to pray together starting tomorrow till next Saturday in any one of the many churches that are found among the buildings of modern Istanbul.

    They will meet first at the Greek Orthodox church, followed by the German church, and then the Evangelical church; then they will visit Santa Maria Draperis Catholic church, where some years ago the Friars Minor created an “International Fraternity for Ecumenical and Inter-faith Dialogue”, one of the most significant international centres for the promotion of dialogue. On Wednesday it will be the turn of the Church of Emmanuel, a US-based Protestant Church; followed the next day by the Armenian Apostolic Church, then the Syriac Orthodox Church, and finally the Armenian Catholic Church.

    “Each year this week is an interesting time in Istanbul,” said Fr Ruben Tierrablanca Gonzales, who is in charge of the Brotherhood of Friars Minor. “An ecumenical commission divides up the eight days between the various Churches. Each day is like a pilgrimage in the different Christian communities who act as host to their fellow brothers and sisters.”

    When you take park in liturgies according to the Latin, Syriac, Armenians Greek or Chaldean rite, in Turkish, Aramaic, Greek, Arabic, English, French or German, you strongly feel the “communion of Saints;” the one Church “holy, universal and apostolic,” constituted by a small but varied group of Christians who meet as a sign of unity and hope in the world.

    Things are very different in Ankara, home to only 250 Christian, mostly Armenian families, who live amongst six million people, with a lonely building serving as a church.

    In the heart of the oldest part of a modern capital built by Ataturk in 1923, at the foot of the Citadel, across from the Museum of Anatolian Civilisations, hidden away amid run-down warehouses and wholesale stores, a salmon-coloured building stands out, a Coat of arms of the French Republic at its front, the French red-white-blue tricolour, waving at the top. This is the Church of Saint Theresa, Ankara’s only parish church.

    In reality in 1905 this used to be Saint Clement College, an institution founded and run by the Christian Schools Brothers. In 1916 it was destroyed by fire as was the surrounding Armenian neighbourhood. Only a supporting wall and an old street name plaque saying “Kardesler sokak” or “Brothers Street” remain as evidence of what it once was.

    In 1928 the French constructed a new building on the old ruins, after claiming title to the land, used it as the Embassy Chancery and French consul residence, before turning it into a French-language school in 1962.

    Through such twists and turns the property was saved and the second floor, first used as the embassy ballroom, was quickly turned into the “French Embassy chapel,” served by a French chaplain.

    Restored in 2002, it is now a Jesuit-run church, a place of worship recognised by the Turkish government, open to all of Ankara’s Christians. Here they meet every Sunday for the Eucharist celebrated by Fr Patrice Julienne de Pommarol, even if they have to do it according to six different rites. Here, ecumenism is the stuff of everyday life.

    As a good French Jesuit and not to do anyone any injustice Father Patrice has set up a 12-member pastoral council representing each confessional community, six men and six women, one per group (Armenian Orthodox, Armenian Catholic, Greek Orthodox, Syriac Orthodox, Syriac Catholic, Latin Catholic).

    For them the Week of Prayer in favour of Christian Unity is not going to represent anything exceptional; it will not entail taking any special initiatives; but it will mean calling upon the Holy Spirit to transform what they experience every day into an ever present reality around the world so that what Jesus wished so much might happen, “that they may all be one” so “that the world may believe that you sent me.” Indeed it is this that the heirs to the Galatians are trying to achieve, recalling the words the fiery Paul of the Nations addressed to them: “For you were called for freedom, brothers,” so “serve one another through love.”

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    See also

    09/07/2007 TURKEY
    The court had no jurisdiction to deny the patriarchate its ecumenical status, says Bartholomew
    A group of Turkish extremists try to prevent non-Turkish members of the sacred Synod from entering the Phanar. The patriarch talks about the difficult situation Christians face in the country. He remembers the murder of Father Santoro, journalist Hrant and three Protestant men in Malatya. He remembers his predecessor, Athenagoras, and the latter’s meeting with Pope Paul VI.

    25/11/2008 TURKEY
    Silent little churches in the land of St. Paul
    For many pilgrims in Turkey, the Pauline Year is an opportunity to find in Tarsus, Antioch, and Ephesus the stones of an ancient past, and the laborious present of a Christian community quenched to a glimmer and marginalized by secularism and by Islam. But they are also a small seed, where it is possible to discover the very mission of St. Paul, unity and charity.

    27/11/2004 VATICAN - TURKEY
    Pope and Bartholomew I: may the Saints help us towards unity
    Ecumenical ceremony takes place in St. Peter's Basilica for the handing over of the relics of Sts. Gregory Nazianzen and John Chrysostom.

    10/04/2007 HONG KONG - TURKEY
    Hong Kong Christian delegation to visit Patriarch Bartholomew
    Anglican, Methodist and Orthodox representatives will meet today with the Ecumenical Patriarch Bartholomew Ist in Istanbul, to speak of cooperation and unity. It is hoped that the eight day voyage will serve to re-enforce unity between Christians.

    25/05/2009 TURKEY
    Erdogan attacks the past, labels Kemalist ethnic cleansing Fascist
    In a clear reference to the Greek and Armenian minorities, the premier attacks blind nationalism that does not want to question the past. Appreciation for Erdogan’s words from the Greeks, Armenians and western diplomats. Now everyone wants facts to follow words.



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