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  • » 05/18/2010, 00.00

    INDIA

    Dantewada: Naxalite Maoists attack bus, killing 45 people



    Special police officers are among the killed. The attack, the second of its kind in just over a month, took place in Dantewada district (Chhattisgarh), some 400 kilometres from the state capital. Security forces are now on high alert in five states as Maoists today launch a 48-hour general strike to protest the government military offensive against them.
    Mumbai (AsiaNews) – The death toll from yesterday’s bus attack by Naxalite Maoist rebels in Dantewada district, some 400 kilometres from Raipur, state capital of Chhattisgarh, has risen to 45, including several special police officers (SPO). The bus, which was carrying SPOs as well as civilians, was travelling to Bhusaras. The vehicle blew up when it drove over an Improvised Explosive Device (IED) placed on the road and detonated by remote control. In a similar attack last month in the same district, the Naxalites killed 76 members of the Central Reserve Police Force.

    Indian security forces are now on maximum alert in the states of Orissa, Bihar, West Bengal, Jharkhand and Chhattisgarh after Maoist rebels launched a 48-hour bandh (general strike) to protest against the government, which began an offensive against the Maoists back in October 2009 to retake areas under their control. In less than a year, some 300 people have been killed in the operation whilst another 50,000 has had to flee their homes.

    The Maoist revolt began in 1967 in the village of Naxalbari (West Bengal) when a group of peasants turned against local landowners over a land dispute.

    In recent years, India’s economic development has led to more confrontations as peasants resist land seizures. Increasingly, they have backed the Maoist insurgency.

    Naxalites and other extreme leftwing groups are active in states like Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand and Orissa. Here, Maoists can field a military force of some 10,000 members, organised in the People's Liberation Guerrilla Army, made up mostly of illiterate peasants.

    In response to this threat, the central government has set up independent paramilitary forces outside of the regular armed forces.

    Lenin Raghuvanshi, director of the People's Vigilance Committee on Human Rights (PVCHR), slammed the attacks, saying, “there is no justification for killing.”

    “Maoists are the armed opposition group with the worst record of human rights violations,” he said. “They do not represent any democratic movement and conduct kangaroo trials by so-called People’s Courts, which summarily judge and execute their political opponents, after labelling them, ‘police informers’.”

    For the human rights activist, the government has to shoulder some of the blame for the situation, especially after it unleashed an offensive using paramilitary groups. This has only fuelled the rebels’ violence.

    In Raghuvanshi’s view, India is now faced with a new form of leftwing extremism, concentrated in a ‘red corridor’ that runs from Nepal in the north to Tamil Nadu in the far south. (N.C.)

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    See also

    11/06/2008 INDIA
    Education and learning against child exploitation, says Lenin Raghuvanshi
    On World Day against Child Labour, the Indian activist calls for better schooling for everyone as the only solution to the problem. Some 55 million children live in slave-like conditions, especially among the lowest castes of society.

    06/12/2007 INDIA
    Spe Salvi asserts human dignity, says Indian human rights activist
    Lenin Raghuvansi, this year’s winner of the prestigious Gwangju Prize for human rights, says that hope in a better future cannot rely on scientific and technological progress if it does not include developing mankind’s consciousness.

    01/07/2008 INDIA
    More than 1,500 people die of torture in Indian prison, human rights activist says
    Commenting data from a report released this year on violence in his country, Lenin Raghuvanshi slams the arbitrary use of force by law enforcement to extract confessions. In the five years covered by the report, from 2002 to 2007, almost 7,500 died in custody.

    16/10/2007 INDIA
    Development not stopping hunger, more than 400 million Indians malnourished
    The International Food Policy Research Institute shows that 40 per cent of the world’s underweight children under five live in India. Add disadvantaged groups like the poor and women who have a hard time feeding themselves and you get 400 million people. Priests and activists point the finger at corruption and bad governance.

    19/05/2010 INDIA
    Fr A.T. Thomas, priest and martyr, victim of Maoism
    Fr Anchanikal T. Thomas, a Jesuit missionary, fought for the poor until his death in the state of Jharkhand, which is now caught between insurgents and landowners. He was martyred in 1997 as he tried to find out about Maoist abuse of locals. Fr M.K. Jose, a fellow Jesuit, said, he “was a victim of Maoist violence. However, his death has enriched the Jesuit mission in Hazaribagh district.”



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