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  • mediazioni e arbitrati, risoluzione alternativa delle controversie e servizi di mediazione e arbitrato


    » 03/19/2015, 00.00

    PAKISTAN

    Lahore attacks: Christian religious leaders ask for forgiveness for the lynching of two Muslims

    Silent Thinker

    The men were suspected of complicity in the Taliban attacks on two churches in Youhanabad, last Sunday. Islamic leaders call on Christians to hand over the culprits. "Those responsible must be brought to justice but who will guarantee their safety?" a Protestant clergyman told AsiaNews.

    Lahore (AsiaNews) - Speaking at a talk show yesterday, Catholic and Protestant religious leaders asked for forgiveness for the killing of two men suspected in terrorist attacks against local churches. The two were lynched by an angry Christian mob and their bodies set on fire.

    Violent protests broken out in Lahore's streets following suicide bombings against two churches in Youhanabad, crowded with Sunday worshippers. Seventeen people, including seven Muslims, were killed and more than 70 wounded in the blasts. Police arrested two armed Muslim men at the scene.

    However, a mob grabbed two men thought to be involved in the attack, beat them to death and then burnt their bodies at the entrance to the neighbourhood.

    After two days, media reports named the two men: Muhammad Naeem, 22, a local glasscutter, and Babar Nauman, 15, a hosiery worker from Sargodha, who was identified by his relatives.

    Today shop owners in the city's southern suburbs closed their doors in a sign of protest against the killing of "innocent" Muslims.

    The authorities deployed nearly 1,500 police in the Christian Quarter, with agents patrolling the dirty streets lined with closed shops. Youhanabad's 35 or so Christian schools will remain closed until next Tuesday.

    "We ask forgiveness for the reaction of the Christian community," said Fr Emmanuel Yousaf Mani, director of the National Commission for Justice and Peace (NCJP) of the Catholic Church of Pakistan.

    "Preachers pray only for peace. We are not experts in anti-terrorism," he said at a talk show held in front of Mary's grotto at St John Catholic Church, whose entrance was damaged in the Taliban attack.

    At the meeting, some 200 Christians were seated before the Archbishop of Lahore Sebastian Shah, two Catholic priests, two Protestant clergymen, two Islamic students and police officers.

    In his address, the bishop told the government that it could expect full collaboration from the Christian community.

    Muslim reactions

    Previously the bishop had visited Punjab Chief Minister Muhammad Shehbaz Sharif, accompanied by a Christian delegation.

    However, as tensions persist, some Christian families have been forced to move in with relatives because, fearing retaliation, they could not go out to get basic supplies.

    Muslim clerics criticised the Church for its slow reaction, calling for its leaders to issue a statement condemning the lynching. They also want Christian leaders to hand over the culprits.

    According to Moulana Hafiz Tahir Mehmood Ashrafi, chairman of the Pakistan Ulema Council, Christians were victims but have become tyrants because of some "hapless" people.

    "You are not able to carry and teach Christ's message of peace," said other Muslim clerics. "It is your responsibility and moral duty to establish a commission to investigate the incident. It is easy to preach from the pulpit but perhaps religious leaders are not mentally prepared to handle the situation on the ground."

    Youhanabad in crisis

    "The chief minister assured us full protection, particularly during the Friday sermon," said Fr Mani, who was among the first to arrive on the scene of the lynching and saw with his own eyes the two dead bodies.

    "Police are now tasked with arresting the people involved in the lynching. This act [lynching] has evened out the church attacks," he told AsiaNews:

    "We can now only ask for forgiveness," said Rev Irshad Ashknaz, vicar at Christ Church. In fact, "There are pressures to arrest Christians."

    "We were present when the congregation was being attacked," he noted. "Now what happened after the blasts is all over the news rather than the attacks themselves."

    "We condemn the killings but we are not sure how things will turn out," the clergyman said in an attempt to deal with accusations against his Church, whose entrance is still stained with blood.

    "I have 6,000 parishioners. I cannot know them all. Those responsible must be brought to justice, but who will guarantee their safety?" he told AsiaNews.

    "During the funeral, I assured those present that the government would protect them so that they could reopen their shops," he explained. However, "Today, when schools reopened, no one came. Once crowded streets were deserted."

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    See also

    24/07/2015 PAKISTAN
    Lahore: ‘Youhanabad Project,’ a summer camp for children victimised by church attacks
    Promoted by Christian associations, the initiative is aimed at alleviating the psychological suffering of children. It began on 12 June and will end on 14 August with a grand finale. Activities include group theatre, music, outings, educational visits, meetings and discussions. For Michelle Chaudhry, this will give children back their confidence and hope.

    12/05/2015 PAKISTAN
    Mothers and widows remember the attacks on Youhanabad churches
    On Mother's Day, Christ Church, one of the two places of worship attacked, organised a prayer ceremony. Naz Bano, whose son died to stop one of the terrorists, and Fozia, now alone to raise a two-year-old girl, tell their story.

    15/03/2015 PAKISTAN
    Church attacks: we are already on the road to Calvary, says Lahore bishop
    Survivors told AsiaNews their stories. Patras Bhatti, a driver who was part of the security detail at the Catholic Church, said the free service they provide is meant "to protect the Church attendants and only God will reward us. Perhaps He saved me to die someday on duty." After the attacks, anti-Taliban demonstrations broke out across Pakistan. Christian schools and colleges will stay closed tomorrow.

    15/03/2015 PAKISTAN
    Lahore: 14 dead and more than 70 wounded in Taliban attack against two Christian churches
    Jamaat-ul-Ahrar militants carried out the twin attack against St John Catholic Church and Christ Church. Almost 2,000 people were in the two buildings at the time of the blasts. A mob lynched an attacker.

    28/03/2016 11:33:00 PAKISTAN
    Taliban in Lahore: "We wanted to kill Christians." But victims include Muslim women and children

    Attack on the Gulshan-i-Iqbal  amusement park by four terrorists; three fled, one blew himself up. His name was Muhammad Yousaf, twenty, educated in an Islamic school in Lahore. Christians and Muslims donate blood for the wounded. Director of Justice and Peace: "It’s like in Syria." Lahore priest: Terrorists choose soft targets to ca greatest number of deaths in the shortest possible time.





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