21 April, 2015 AsiaNews.it Twitter AsiaNews.it Facebook            

Help AsiaNews | About us | P.I.M.E. | | RssNewsletter | Mobile






mediazioni e arbitrati, risoluzione alternativa delle controversie e servizi di mediazione e arbitrato
e-mail this to a friend printable version


» 09/10/2012
IRAQ
Archbishop of Kirkuk: sectarian violence in Iraq "politically motivated"
by Joseph Mahmood
A series of attacks across the country leave an estimated 100 dead and over 350 injured. The violent response to the death penalty imposed in absentia on Sunni Vice President Tariq al-Hashemi. Archbishop Sako: divided government, reconciliation project faltering, a fragmented nation and "common" traits with events in Syria, and strong impact of nearby countries. Hopes for peace and future prospects in Benedict XVI's visit to Lebanon.

Kirkuk (AsiaNews) - "The violence is linked to sectarian and confessional tensions, the attacks are of a political nature, I do not think they involve the local mafia or terrorist groups close to Islamic fundamentalism", says Msgr. Louis Sako, archbishop of Kirkuk in northern Iraq commenting on the wave of attacks that bloodied the country yesterday, causing nearly one hundred dead and over 350 injured in 20 separate episodes. The attacks are coupled with the death penalty imposed in absentia on Sunni Vice President Tariq al-Hashemi, for organizing death squads responsible for at least 150 killings. "The attacks - adds the prelate speaking to AsiaNews - are politically motivated, with characteristics in common with developments in Syria and the events in the Middle East". In this bleak framework, plagued by a never-ending spiral of violence, comes the Pope's visit to Lebanon September 14 to 16, which for the Church is now "an opportunity to encourage the building of bridges of dialogue and peace, especially with Muslims . Though, at the moment, everything appears difficult, if not almost blocked by the political situation. "

Yesterday a series of attacks targeted different districts in Baghdad's Shiite majority areas, in response to the death penalty imposed on Sunni Vice President Tariq al-Hashemi. It was one of the "bloodiest" days of the year, with more than 100 deaths across the country in addition at least 350 injured in provisional estimates. The attacks swept the capital, Kirkuk in the north, Amara in the south-east, Dujail north of Baghdad, Nasiriyah in the south of the country and other minor episodes in Baquba, Basra, Samarra and Tuzkhurmatu.

The violence erupted not long after the condemning in absentia for Vice-President al-Hashemi, leader of the Sunni minority, accused of organizing death squads responsible for at least 150 victims. Until last December, when charges were laid, he was the political point of reference for the Sunni faction within the Iraqi government, supported by a large Shia majority. He took refuge in the autonomous region of Kurdistan in the north, then fled to Qatar and finally Turkey. During the trial in the capital, some close collaborators admitted that in the past the vice-president himself ordered dozens of murders. Critics speak of "politically motivated charges", but AsiaNews sources say that "there is evidence that appears to prove he is not innocent."

"At the root of these attacks - said Msgr. Sako - is a strong tension between the Shiite majority and the Sunni faction and this violence is clearly sectarian and confessional in nature." In Kirkuk alone, the archbishop continued, there were four targeted killings of innocent people. "The aim - says the prelate - is to destabilize the country" because "the central government lacks unity and political force even within the same Shiite majority. There is great tension, there is no dialogue between groups and greater barriers are emerging ".

In fact, the archbishop of Kirkuk observes that the Middle East "is like a volcano" and the effects of the crisis affecting the countries that form the region affect even Iraq. In this context, Benedict XVI's visit to Lebanon becomes even more important: "We are waiting for words of hope from the  Pope - says the Archbishop - and encouragement for the Church, which must build bridges of peace and dialogue with everyone, but especially with Muslims" . He confirms that "the exodus of the Christian community" Iraq "continues and affects areas where they live in peace. Little is being done to help them to remain in the country of origin, rather they are being encouraged to leave."

"We need a real dialogue - Msgr. Sako concludes - between the Churches of the Middle East and serious and deep analysis of the reality, providing solutions and future plans, we need concrete steps to restore confidence and a vision of the future of Christians in region and the Middle East. "

 

 


e-mail this to a friend printable version

See also
11/18/2010 IRAQ
Archbishop Sako: the death penalty for Aziz and others is only an act of revenge
02/24/2012 IRAQ
Bloodbath in Iraq, 55 dead and 225 wounded. Al Qaeda claims killing
03/11/2008 IRAQ
Silence must not descend on Archbishop of Mosul
04/24/2009 IRAQ
Two attacks in Baghdad kill 60, country on the edge of civil war
07/31/2008 IRAQ
Christians and Muslims show solidarity for Kirkuk attack victims

Editor's choices
VATICAN
Pope remembers and prays for "latest tragedy" of migrants, "our brothers and sisters" who "are seeking happiness"At the Regina Caeli, Pope Francis says he is praying for the hundreds of victims in a sinking off the coast of Libya. An appeal to the international community to "act decisively and promptly." "Every baptized person is called to witness in word and deed, that Jesus is risen, He is alive and present in our midst." The Christian message "is not a theory, an ideology or a complex system of precepts and prohibitions, or moralism, but a message of salvation, a concrete event, even a person: the Risen Christ, the living and only Savior of all" . The Pope will be in Turin on June 21 to honor the Shroud, the exposition of which begins today.
SAUDI ARABIA – YEMEN
Saudi war in Yemen masks widening domestic tensions
by Afshin ShahiSaudi Arabia is using the conflict in Yemen to control domestic problems, especially social inequalities and religious sectarianism. However, whilst the royal family flaunts its wealth, some 20 per cent of the population lives in poverty. Many disgruntled young Saudis end up becoming "foreign fighters" for the Islamic state (IS). Some 15 per cent of the Saudi population is Shia, under the heavy thumb of the Sunni-dominated state. Afshin Shahi, director of the Centre for the Study of Political Islam and lecturer in International Relations and Middle East Politics at University of Bradford, provides the following lucid analysis.
VATICAN
Pope: on the persecution of Christians, the international community should "not stand by mute and inactive” and “look away”For the sixth time in a week, Pope Francis mentioned the martyrdom of Christians in today’s Regina Caeli (the Marian prayer at Easter), slamming the indifference of the international community towards this "alarming failure to protect basic human rights.” Today’s martyrs "are many, and we can say that they are more numerous than in the first centuries." In addition, “Faith in the resurrection of Jesus and the hope He has brought to us is the most beautiful gift that a Christian can and must offer his brothers and sisters. To one and all, therefore, do not tire of repeating: Christ is Risen!”

Dossier

by Giulio Aleni / (a cura di) Gianni Criveller
pp. 176
Copyright © 2003 AsiaNews C.F. 00889190153 All rights reserved. Content on this site is made available for personal, non-commercial use only. You may not reproduce, republish, sell or otherwise distribute the content or any modified or altered versions of it without the express written permission of the editor. Photos on AsiaNews.it are largely taken from the internet and thus considered to be in the public domain. Anyone contrary to their publication need only contact the editorial office which will immediately proceed to remove the photos.