18 September, 2014 AsiaNews.it Twitter AsiaNews.it Facebook            

Help AsiaNews | About us | P.I.M.E. | | RssNewsletter | Mobile





mediazioni e arbitrati, risoluzione alternativa delle controversie e servizi di mediazione e arbitrato
e-mail this to a friend printable version


» 02/19/2010
TURKEY
Erdogan would not mind an appeal by the Ecumenical Patriarchate to the European Court
by NAT da Polis
The Patriarch’s aim, it is rumoured, is the recognition of the right to reopen the theological school, the fundamental battle for freedom of religion. For the current government a Strasbourg ruling would be useful to help undermine bureaucratic resistance of the establishment to any reform project

Istanbul (AsiaNews) – Appeal to the International Court in Strasbourg. This is the idea which, according to diplomatic sources in Brussels, is being matured by the Ecumenical Patriarchate in order to see the reopening of the Theological School of Halki (see photo).   

The idea, according to the same sources, has met with favourable results within the Union, given the difficulties and the unwillingness of the Erdogan government to proceed with the reopening of the school. Because, according to voices in the community setting, as long as there is a continuing clash between the old establishment and Erdogan’s current reformist government there will be no solution to the problem of recognition of the rights of Christian minorities in Turkey, of which the reopening of Halki is a significant point.  

The action in itself is nothing new, because the same Patriarch Bartholomew has repeatedly expressed his intention to appeal to international forums to vindicate rights that have been trampled for decades.

What is surprising, according to Brussels, is that this initiative has apparently been approved by certain sectors of the Turkish bureaucracy close to Erdogan's reformist project. Because they believe that the judgments of Strasbourg - which in principle are binding - are the only way to break the old establishment, which hinders any reform. The rulings, in short, would help Erdogan's reformist cabinet in its approach to the Turkish bureaucratic apparatus, which considers itself heir to the secularist concept, and of which the judiciary, right up to the Supreme Court, are the last bastion after the army has been  - for the moment – close to collapse following the Ergenekon affair  (the Turkish Gladio).

The statements made in this regard by Cilek, deputy head of the government party AKP, have been both significant and explanatory. A figure of authority, Cilek in a recent meeting with students made a symbolic radiography of the contemporary Kemalist state. Turkey, he said, was founded (and the founders were mostly refugees from the Balkans, while current reformists instead express an Asian soul) as a parliamentary republic. But without democracy, since a "secular" and authoritarian bureaucracy was created, which is now outdated and anachronistic, pledged to prevent any development of Turkish society and always under the watchful eye of the army. (Remember that in Turkey before 1946   the migration of peasants of Anatolia and Istanbul to Ankara was prohibited in order not to contaminate the Western ways of the bureaucratic elite). In short, for Cilak, a bureaucracy seeking to protect the state from the desires of the population. A so-called secular state, that has not accepted the principle of religious freedom for its minorities can not champion the rights of Muslims in Europe. In a Europe, he concluded, where there are 4 thousand mosques and various centres of Muslim culture. Erdogan himself responding long ago to the army chief of staff, who wanted to express the regret of the military for the past events, was quick to ironically remind him that even the Turkish population has been plagued for decades but has never been able to express his regret.    

It seems, finally, not by chance that the choice of new Turkish ambassador to the Holy See was made outside the circles of diplomatic service, another stronghold of the old establishment, and that the diplomat before his departure for Rome made a courtesy visit to Ecumenical Patriarch. For the first time.

 


e-mail this to a friend printable version

See also
07/10/2008 TURKEY - EU
Court of Strasbourg recognises legal status of ecumenical patriarchate and condemns Turkey
by NAT da Polis
11/29/2007 TURKEY
The Supreme Court in Strasburg allows Patriarchs’ appeal for Buyukada orphanage
03/04/2004 turkey
Long, upward battle still ahead for religious freedom
09/30/2006 TURKEY
Europe asks Turkey to "free" school of Ecumenical Patriarchate
by Franco Pisano
08/01/2007 TURKEY
Plot against the ecumenical Patriarch foiled

Editor's choices
IRAQ-VATICAN
"Adopt a Christian from Mosul": Archbishops’ thanks as first aid arrives
by Amel NonaMsgr. Amel Nona, the Chaldean Archbishop of Mosul, who is also a refugee himself, thanks all the donors to the AsiaNews campaign. The situation is increasingly difficult given the huge number of refugees and the arrival of winter and snow, making outdoor shelters and tents impossible. The crisis, an occasion that activates the faith of Christians.
ITALY - IRAQ
After raising € 350,000, 'Adopt a Christian from Mosul' campaign continues
by Bernardo CervelleraDonations raised up to 31 August have been sent to the patriarch of Baghdad and the bishops of Kurdistan. The campaign helps to feed, house, clothe, and bring comfort to more than 150,000 Christian, Yazidi, Turkmen, Shia and Sunni refugees who fled the violence of the army of the Islamic Caliphate. People in Italy and around the world have been generous, including the poor and the unemployed, a sign of hope for the world as well as those who suffer and those who give.
IRAQ-ITALY
"Adopt a Christian from Mosul," the thanks of the Patriarch Louis Sako; the concerns of the Bishop of Kurdistan
by Bernardo CervelleraThe head of the Chaldean Church is grateful for the AsiaNews campaign and hopes that "this chain of solidarity will reach far and wide”. Helping refugees to remain in Iraq. But many want to flee abroad. The bishop of Amadiyah where thousands of displaced people have found haven in churches and homes: We also help the Arabs (Muslims), and Yazidis, for free and without looking at our confessional differences.

Dossier
by Giulio Aleni / (a cura di) Gianni Criveller
pp. 176
by Lazzarotto Angelo S.
pp. 528
by Bernardo Cervellera
pp. 240
Copyright © 2003 AsiaNews C.F. 00889190153 All rights reserved. Content on this site is made available for personal, non-commercial use only. You may not reproduce, republish, sell or otherwise distribute the content or any modified or altered versions of it without the express written permission of the editor. Photos on AsiaNews.it are largely taken from the internet and thus considered to be in the public domain. Anyone contrary to their publication need only contact the editorial office which will immediately proceed to remove the photos.