22 October, 2014 AsiaNews.it Twitter AsiaNews.it Facebook            

Help AsiaNews | About us | P.I.M.E. | | RssNewsletter | Mobile





mediazioni e arbitrati, risoluzione alternativa delle controversie e servizi di mediazione e arbitrato
e-mail this to a friend printable version


» 08/09/2012
JAPAN
Nagasaki mayor calls for a nuclear-free world
Tomihisa Taue wants "concrete steps" towards a Nuclear Weapons Convention." Nagasaki's mayor also wants nuclear power to be replaced by alternative sources. He said his city will "continue to support the people of Fukushima" victimised by the March 2011 accident.

Nagasaki (AsiaNews/Agencies) - Nagasaki called on world leaders today to conclude a treaty banning nuclear weapons at a ceremony marking the 67th anniversary of 'Fat Man,' the codename for the atomic bomb that destroyed the city (the bomb that devastated Hiroshima on 6 August was codenamed 'Little Boy'). "The international community must act now by taking the first concrete steps toward concluding the Nuclear Weapons Convention," Mayor Tomihisa Taue said. He also expressed his city's solidarity with the victims of last year's Fukushima nuclear disaster, survivors as well as relatives now facing hardships.

In his address, Mayor Taue also called on the central government to address the "serious challenge" presented by North Korea's nuclear arms threat. In a speech, Prime Minister Yoshihiko Noda declared that Japan has a "responsibility" to encourage countries and the international community to eliminate their nuclear arsenals.

For the first time, US Ambassador John Roos attended the ceremony along with representatives from about 40 countries. Roos did attend Hiroshima's annual peace ceremony before, but never Nagasaki's. Both mark the atomic bombs dropped by the United States that ended the Second World War in the summer 1945.

In Nagasaki, up to 80,000 people were incinerated in the blast or died from radiation-related illnesses by the end of 1945. The number of officially recognised Nagasaki hibakusha, the surviving victims of the atomic bombings, stood at 39,324 as of March, with an average age of 77 and half years.

In an explicit reference to the March 2011 nuclear disaster in Fukushima, Mayor Taue called for a society "free from the fear of radioactivity." He is the first Japanese mayor to call on Japan to move away from nuclear energy and promote instead new energy sources in place of nuclear power.

Taue also called for action on the radioactive waste that has piled up, and pledged that Nagasaki would "continue to support the people of Fukushima".

 


e-mail this to a friend printable version

See also
08/06/2012 JAPAN
Hiroshima marks 67 years since atomic bomb with one eye on Fukushima
06/28/2012 JAPAN
Kashiwazaki, Tepco wants to reactivate the largest nuclear power plant in the world
10/20/2009 JAPAN
Hiroshima and Nagasaki dream of Olympics 2020
by Pino Cazzaniga
08/03/2009 JAPAN
The atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, a moral failure
by Pino Cazzaniga
08/06/2005 japan
Ceremonies mark Hiroshima horror; admonish the world

Editor's choices
IRAQ - ITALY
Almost 700,000 euros raised as the 'Adopt a Christian from Mosul' campaign continues
by Bernardo CervelleraA second instalment is sent with funds raised in September. The fate of East-West relations is being played out in the Middle East and Iraq. Pope Francis and the Synod issue an appeal. Governments are lukewarm. Aid is coming from around the world. A new international community is defeating the "globalisation of indifference."
IRAQ-VATICAN
"Adopt a Christian from Mosul": Archbishops’ thanks as first aid arrives
by Amel NonaMsgr. Amel Nona, the Chaldean Archbishop of Mosul, who is also a refugee himself, thanks all the donors to the AsiaNews campaign. The situation is increasingly difficult given the huge number of refugees and the arrival of winter and snow, making outdoor shelters and tents impossible. The crisis, an occasion that activates the faith of Christians.
ITALY - IRAQ
After raising € 350,000, 'Adopt a Christian from Mosul' campaign continues
by Bernardo CervelleraDonations raised up to 31 August have been sent to the patriarch of Baghdad and the bishops of Kurdistan. The campaign helps to feed, house, clothe, and bring comfort to more than 150,000 Christian, Yazidi, Turkmen, Shia and Sunni refugees who fled the violence of the army of the Islamic Caliphate. People in Italy and around the world have been generous, including the poor and the unemployed, a sign of hope for the world as well as those who suffer and those who give.

Dossier

by Giulio Aleni / (a cura di) Gianni Criveller
pp. 176
Copyright © 2003 AsiaNews C.F. 00889190153 All rights reserved. Content on this site is made available for personal, non-commercial use only. You may not reproduce, republish, sell or otherwise distribute the content or any modified or altered versions of it without the express written permission of the editor. Photos on AsiaNews.it are largely taken from the internet and thus considered to be in the public domain. Anyone contrary to their publication need only contact the editorial office which will immediately proceed to remove the photos.